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Crowd surrounds cops in Hoboken when they try to break up…

first_imgHOBOKEN–Four men were arrested in the wee hours of Saturday, Nov. 25 after a fight broke out outside of a bar on downtown Washington Street. Two officers were injured.Hoboken resident Hashim Dyer, age 21, was charged with aggravated assault on a police officer, hindering apprehension, and resisting arrest.Hoboken resident Frank Henderson, age 22, was charged with aggravated assault on a police officer, hindering apprehension, and failure to disperse.Jersey City resident Christian Caputo, age 23, was charged with aggravated assault on a police officer, hindering apprehension, and failure to disperse.Jersey City resident Robert Rosario, age 21, was charged with hindering apprehension and failure to disperse.Dyer, Caputo, and Rosario were released with summonses to appear in court and Henderson was remanded to the Hudson county correctional facility.Officers were patrolling downtown Washington Street when they saw a fight outside a local bar. As they tried to break up the fight between men and women, more smaller fights began. The officers requested back up to assist controlling the large unruly crowd. As the officers tried to stop the fight Officer Michael Losurdo was allegedly charged by Christian Caputo and thrown to the ground. He was able to control the defendant with the help of Officer Tyrone Huggins and placed him under arrest.During the arrest of Caputo, Henderson and Rosario allegedly attempted to assist Caputo by charging the officers and pull him away. They officers regained control of Caputo and Henderson and Rosario allegedly fled the scene.A crowd formed around the officers as they attempted to place Caputo into the car. Sgt. Michael Costello tried to help clear a path for them when he was allegedly jumped from behind by Hashim Dyer who was then placed under arrest.Other police officers arrived to help including New Jersey Transit, New Jersey State Police, and North Bergen Police along with Port Authority.Rosario and Henderson were later found and placed under arrest. All were transported to headquarters for processing.Losurdo and Costello were treated at Hoboken University Medical Center for injuries. Lossurdo suffered injuries to his head leg and ear and was cleared for duty while. Costello sustained a back injury and has not yet been cleared to return.Police Chief Ken Ferrante took to twitter the morning of the arrest and said “Last night, we had 2 HobokenPD officers from our midnight shift injured breaking up a brawl involving 40 people… Bars or restaurants that can’t control crowds will not be tolerated.” ×last_img read more

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Graduating seniors set to enter into service work

first_imgWhile many graduates prepare to enter the traditional work force, roughly 10 percent of the class of 2012 are set to pursue service work after graduation. Graduating senior Annie Boyle is one such student looking to make the leap into something different.  Boyle said her experiences at Notre Dame helped her decide to volunteer after graduation.  “I have committed to a year with the Jesuit Volunteer Corps (JVC) in the Northwest. I’ll be working at a Catholic Charities organization in Spokane, Wash.,” she said. “My Summer Service Learning Program (SSLP) had perhaps the greatest influence on my decision to commit to post-grad service.”  Boyle’s SSLP took her to a camp for children and teens with physical disabilities for eight weeks. She said the atmosphere at Notre Dame and the opportunity to interact with service-oriented individuals was also influential.  “The kids that I met during my SSLP exhibited more positive energy than most individuals that I know. Each had a great capacity for finding joy in life’s everyday activities, despite the physical challenges that these activities often posed,” Boyle said. “They became my own little role models for living in gratitude.”  Boyle said she looks forward to the sense of community in the JVC.   “I’m looking forward to meeting and learning from people with different life experiences than my own,” she said. “I’ll be living with five to six other volunteers.”  Boyle said her work with the JVC will help her prepare for other challenges and positions in life as she continues to be engaged with social issues.  “I think that a year, or more, of full-time service allows grads not only to deepen their awareness of social issues and work toward positive change, but also to achieve a better understanding of their personal strengths and values,” she said.  Erica Michelle Severson, a 2011 graduate who works as a patient navigator for breast cancer patients with the Redeemer Ministry Corps, said her choice to enter volunteer service gave her time to discern a future career in medicine, dentistry or other allied health fields. “Professional school is a very large commitment, so before I put a large amount of time and money into it, I wanted to be sure of the profession I chose,” she said. “Doing service is also a fabulous way to learn more about yourself in an environment you normally wouldn’t be exposed to.”  Severson said the mission of Redeemer Ministry Corps is to “Care, Comfort and Heal.” Volunteers serve in ministries throughout the Holy Redeemer Health System and the local community, she said.  Spending the summer after her sophomore year in an Summer Service Learning Project (SSLP) at Matthew 25, a free medical and dental clinic in Indiana, helped her with the decision, she said.  “I felt honored to help serve so many patients and provide them with comfort during their suffering,” she said. “The experience allowed me to witness the trials of those who are uninsured and develop a greater understanding of poverty.”  Severson said she plans to return to school for a masters program before pursuing dental school.  “After my experience working in a health system, I want to coordinate positive changes in healthcare,” she said. “I would love to found a non-profit organization or work for one in the future.”  She said graduates entering volunteer service should be patient and flexible, especially as their job tasks change throughout the year.  “Every action you perform might not be the most valuable or significant contribution, but it is necessary to perform to the work you’re doing,” Severson said. “Remember this year is a learning experience.”  Many seniors who are participating in service work after graduation discerned their path of volunteerism with the help of the Center for Social Concerns (CSC).  Michael Hebbeler, director of Student Leadership and Senior Transitions at the CSC, said the Senior Transitions Program is designed to assist students who hope to integrate social concerns into their postgraduate careers.  “The CSC is committed to helping students discern their vocation, whether it’s through seminar immersions, summer service-learning programs, theological reflection, the study of Catholic Social Teaching or local volunteer service,” he said.  Hebbeler said a special commencement ceremony will be held in honor of students entering volunteer service on May 19 in the Leighton Concert Hall of the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center. Speakers will include University President Fr. John Jenkins, Bill Lies, CSC executive director and Katie Bergin, a 1994 graduate who volunteered with the Holy Cross in Chile.  Hebbeler said students entering post-graduate service work should be open to where the experience may take them.  “Recognize that the greatest challenges and sorrows just might lead to the greatest growth, to celebrate the joys, and to trust,” he said.last_img read more

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Muay Thai champion Sam-A to fight contender Josh a ONE’s main bout

first_imgThe event will also see the return of lightweight proponent Amir Khan, who is known for having the most knockout finishes in ONE Championship history, a record he shares with his Evolve teammate and reigning ONE lightweight world champion Christian “The Warrior” Lee.Khan will take on rising Indian lightweight Rahul “The Kerala Krusher” Raju.Also seeing action on the card is another of Khan’s Evolve stablemates in multiple-time Indonesian wrestling champion Eko Roni Saputra. Eko, a former Indonesian national athlete, is aiming for his third victory in the circle when he takes on promotional newcomer Murugan “Wolverine” Silvarajoo of Malaysia.Multiple-time Lumpinee Stadium Muay Thai world champion and former inaugural ONE strawweight world champion Dejdamrong Sor Amnuaysirichoke makes his highly anticipated return to action.Dejdamrong will face China Top Team’s “Wolf of the Grasslands” Hexigetu in what should be another exciting matchup.Lastly, Indian wrestling champion “The Indian Notorious” Roshan Mainam will look to build upon his recent success and add another victory to his record when he faces ONE Hefei Flyweight Tournament champion Liu Peng Shuai in the opening bout of the night.Topics : Reigning ONE strawweight Muay Thai and kickboxing world champion Sam-A Gaiyanghadao of Thailand will defend his Muay Thai title against top contender Josh “Timebomb” Tonna of Australia in the main bout of ONE; Reign of Dynasties, which will be streamed online through the ONE app and YouTube channel on Oct. 9.The venue and the location will be confirmed and announced by ONE Championship later on.In another bout, three-time European grappling champion Aleksi “The Giant” Toivonen of Finland will take on former ONE world title challenger and fifth-ranked flyweight contender Reece “Lightning” McLaren of Australia.last_img read more

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Mourinho unhappy with Del Bosque

first_imgJose Mourinho thinks Spain coach Vicente del Bosque is the man to blame for Diego Costa’s recent injury troubles. Costa began the season in prolific fashion, scoring nine goals in seven matches, but he has missed Chelsea’s last three fixtures because of a persistent hamstring injury. The former Atletico Madrid man had also been suffering from a cold in the build-up to Sunday’s match against Manchester United, but Mourinho revealed it was injury, rather than illness that ruled the £32million signing out of the match at Old Trafford. Press Association The striker has been troubled by the hamstring problem for some time, but Mourinho believes it was exacerbated by Spain coach Del Bosque, who fielded the 26-year-old for back-to-back games against Slovakia and Luxembourg at the start of October. “The virus is fine,” the Chelsea manager said. “It was hard, he had to go to the hospital and obviously it doesn’t help him to recover from his injury. But he didn’t play on Sunday because of the injury, not because of the virus. “Diego has the hamstring (problem) because he played two matches in three days when he was not with us.” Mourinho voiced his concern over a lack of communication with Del Bosque and other national coaches earlier this month and the problem still clearly concerns him. When asked whether he hoped Costa’s injury problems were now over, Mourinho replied: “But he still has (to play for) the national team in November!” For the immediate future, Mourinho looks as though he will be able to depend on the striker. “I think so,” replied the Portuguese when asked if Costa would be fit for Saturday’s Barclays Premier League game against QPR. Mourinho confirmed the Brazil-born front man would not travel to Shrewsbury for Tuesday’s Capital One Cup fourth round match against the League Two side. Given that he is 36-years-old, Didier Drogba will need to “sleep for 24 hours” after his exertions at Old Trafford and will therefore miss Tuesday’s game. With Loic Remy out through injury, Andre Schurrle is expected to lead the line at New Meadow, although young forward Dominic Solanke could also feature. Mourinho confirmed in a post-match briefing at Old Trafford that Schurrle, Mohamed Salah, Kurt Zouma, John Obi Mikel and 19-year-old midifelder Lewis Baker will play at Shrewsbury. The Shrews are 71 places below Mourinho’s unbeaten side in the league ladder so it was with little surprise that the Chelsea boss called Tuesday’s match a “friendly”. The two-time League Cup winner still refuses to take victory over the League Two promotion contenders for granted though. He added: “You can say that Shrewsbury in the Capital One Cup is a friendly, but we have to play the match and respect the match. “They are doing very well in their league, they are did very well against superior teams (Norwich, Blackpool and Leicester) in the Capital One Cup. “It is a big day for them and we know it is going to be difficult for us. “And because we have so many injured players, it is even more difficult.” last_img read more

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Nothing going right for Green and White as Leafs drop seventh straight game

first_imgSure it’s nice that the calendar only reads November on the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League season.But at some point, the Nelson Leafs had better start turning around their season.The Green and White lost for the seventh straight time Sunday in Spokane, dropping a 4-1 KIJHL decision to the Braves in action in the Lilac City.Like many of the previous six losses, the Leafs started strong.Sunday, the same story unfolded as Nelson outshot the Braves 17-9 in the first period but failed to score. Second period, again the Leafs held the advantage on the shot counter, this time by an 18-8 margin. And the Canadian visitors even took the lead when Ryan Piva notched his eighth marker of the season.However, before the end of the period Spokane’s Carter Jones tied the game.Jones then scored this second of the game midway through the third period. Mark Pretorius increased the lead to 3-1 just over a minute later before Paxton Malone scored with one second left in the game to complete the scoring.Nelson outshot the Braves 49-32 in the game making a winner out of netminder J.J. Pichette.Jason Sandhu took the loss for Nelson.Nelson drops to 8-11-0-0-2, fourth in the Murdoch Division and 14 points behind front running Beaver Valley Nitehawks. The Hawks continue to soar in the KIJJHL, winners of 12 straight games and tied for top spot in the league with Creston Valley Thunder Cats — each with 32 points.Nelson remains on the road travelling to the East Kootenay for games against Golden Rockets Friday and Columbia Valley Rockies Saturday.On the positive front, both Eddie Mountain teams are also struggling in the standings.But that doesn’t mean much for a team that was talked up as being a threat to take over the Murdoch Division of the KIJHL after a disastrous 2015-16 season of a year ago.last_img read more

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Patrick Marleau sheds tears of joy in Shark Tank return

first_imgCharacters? You bet. The name Link … I’m going to guess that most Sharks observers had the same reaction early in the 1997-98 season upon seeing Patrick Marleau for the first time.“Who’s that?” I asked a colleague, incredulous, upon seeing Marleau streak down the ice with wings on his skates.Marleau was just a kid then, 18 years old. The Sharks were even younger — just starting their seventh season.The Sharks had compiled a relatively comprehensive dossier for such a young outfit.last_img

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Warriors ink lucrative jersey deal with Rakuten

first_imgBSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight LATEST STORIES Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Read Next WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding The deal includes naming the team’s practice facility the Rakuten Performance Center.USA Today reported that about half of all NBA teams have inked jersey sponsor deals since the league green-lighted the move.ESPN reported the Warriors’ agreement with Rakuten was worth $20 million per year over three years.That’s twice as lucrative as the next-largest jersey sponsorship deal to date — the $10 million per season agreement between the Warriors’ vanquished finals foe the Cleveland Cavaliers and the Goodyear tire company.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Who are Filipinos rooting for in the NBA Finals? PLAY LIST 01:43Who are Filipinos rooting for in the NBA Finals?02:25Raptors or Warriors? PBA players take their pick of NBA champ03:12Kevin Durant out with Achilles injury; to undergo MRI on Tuesday01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF presidentcenter_img Los Angeles, United States — As the NBA joins sports leagues around the world in allowing sponsors’ names on jerseys, the Golden State Warriors have inked a logo deal with Rakuten worth a reported $60 million (50 million euros) over three years.The deal with the reigning NBA champions is just one of the sports sponsorships pursued by Rakuten, the Japanese e-commerce giant whose logo now graces the FC Barcelona kit.ADVERTISEMENT Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Rakuten chief Hiroshi Mikitani told a press conference in Oakland, California, on Tuesday that he was “thrilled” to announce his partnership with the Warriors and the NBA.Warriors chief marketing officer Chip Bowers said the team was attracted to Rakuten for its global reach and its local affiliation, with cash-back site Ebates headquartered in San Francisco.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“We really liked the fact that they had a local presence, so it’s a global brand out of Tokyo, Japan, but to have Ebates headquartered here, to have Rakuten have offices here, it had a local feel to it, but it gave us a global audience to speak to,” said the Warriors’ chief marketing officer Chip Bowers.Rakuten, which also owns messaging app Viber and ebook brand Kobo as well as J-League football club Vissel Kobe and pro baseball team Rakuten Golden Eagles — will have its red-and-black logo featured on the Warriors’ white jerseys starting this season. A white logo will adorn the club’s blue away jerseys. The badges will be on the front left — opposite the Nike logo. NLEX eyes QF bonus E.T. returns to earth, reunites with grown-up Elliott in new ad  LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

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6 days agoWolves boss Nuno: Euro lessons still being learned

first_imgWolves boss Nuno: Euro lessons still being learnedby Paul Vegas6 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveWolves boss Nuno Espirito Santo has denied they’re finally now handling their Europa League commitments.After a slow start to the season, Wolves picked up their third straight Premier League win just before the international break when they stunned Manchester City 2-0 at the Etihad.”We don’t have show anything to anybody,” he said ahead of Saturday’s visit of Southampton.”We work for ourselves, for our fans and for the club. We don’t have nothing to prove to nobody.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

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Residential schools settlement agreement under fire

first_imgBy Paul Barnsley and Kathleen MartensAPTN InvestigatesSIOUX LOOKOUT, Ont.– For the second time this month a call has come to review the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement (IRSSA).In early May, Chief Bill Erasmus, the Assembly of First Nations executive member who is responsible for the residential schools portfolio, called for a review of the $4 billion out-of-court settlement that allowed the federal government and several churches to escape having to defend themselves against a handful of class-action lawsuits related to human rights violations and criminal acts committed against children who were students at the schools.Erasmus said there is widespread criticism amongst the survivors about the way some of the defendants in the original class actions – the federal government and the Catholic Church – have conducted themselves as the settlement agreement has been administered.Then, on May 17, Garnet Angeconeb, a respected long-time advocate for survivors of residential schools, sent a letter to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett, and several opposition politicians. APTN Investigates obtained a copy of that letter.Angeconeb added his voice to the call for a review of the settlement agreement. He wants an independent review that is court supervised and free of government influence.From Lac Seul First Nation in northwestern Ontario, Angeconeb is a member of the Order of Canada. He is also one of the founders of the Sioux Lookout Anti-Racism Committee.During a phone interview, he said that other survivors have told him repeatedly throughout the pre- and post-settlement process that they felt their needs always came last in what became an extremely complex, legalistic, and bureaucratic process.Told that many survivors have said they came to see the system as designed by lawyers and bureaucrats for lawyers and bureaucrats, he replied, “Bingo!”While the survivor of sexual abuse at Pelican Falls Residential School, near Sioux Lookout, acknowledged that a lot of work has been done to address the wrongs of the Indian residential schools, he says the work of healing and true reconciliation is far from over.“There is meaningful dialogue happening within the country’s chambers of political and spiritual decision makers about reconciliation,” he wrote, “but those discussions cannot leave behind the healing support that many survivors still require. That requirement needs to be measured by way of an independent evaluation – a review – of the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement.Angeconeb told the prime minister that many survivors feel the Independent Assessment Process (IAP) set up under the IRSSA has not brought closure – and in many cases it hasn’t even brought justice.“At a recent gathering of survivors, one person questioned and rightfully so, ‘How can I begin to talk about reconciliation when I am not healing?’” he wrote. “Unresolved historic trauma carries with it many heavy complexities. For many, the pain eats away at the very core of their daily existence. The pain must stop. We must learn from the past.”He told Trudeau a “review of the IRSSA must be conducted to measure the successes and shortcomings and the impacts the agreement had directly on the survivors.”He was careful to say that the purpose of the review he proposes is not to re-negotiate the agreement. He just wants the agreement to be fully implemented.“As the life span of the IRSSA is soon to expire, the parties have started to wind down their operations. The courts should lay out a strict deadline for the review to be completed and a final report presented to them so they can determine whether or not all elements of the IRSSA have been appropriately completed, including any funds still owed by the churches,” he wrote.Angeconeb believes the scope of the review should include the government, the churches, the Indian Residential Schools Adjudication Secretariat, which oversees the IAP and Crawford Class Action Services, the Waterloo, Ont. based company that has administered the settlement agreement on behalf of the nine courts that have supervised the implementation of the out-of-court settlement that brought several class action lawsuits against Canada and the churches to a close.He also urged the prime minister to ensure the final report of the review be made public.“In particular, the findings must be made available to the survivors,” he wrote.A number of complaints have been made against lawyers who represented survivors in the IAP, where the former students related their experiences to adjudicators who then determined what compensation they should receive for the serious physical and/or sexual abuse they say they were subjected to in the schools.Calgary lawyer David Blott, who represented close to 6,000 survivors in the IAP, was disbarred after an investigation revealed he did not adequately represent his clients. It was found that Blott clients were improperly prepared for meetings with adjudicators, were provided with high-interest loans made against their eventual settlement payments – even though that practice was expressly forbidden by the settlement agreement and by federal law – and were in some cases denied compensation because their written testimony, that was changed by people working with or for Blott, did not match up to their oral testimony during the adjudication meeting.Many former Blott clients have joined a class-action lawsuit to recover money lost through Blott’s actions. But that lawsuit is presently stalled as federal government lawyers resist disclosing certain information to lawyers acting for the former Blott clients.Daniel Ish, the now-retired former chief IAP adjudicator, told APTN Investigates in 2011 it was not his job to advocate for the survivors. In fact, he added that there was no one to advocate for survivors within the IAP process.Survivors who lost out because of Blott’s actions were advised to hire a lawyer and sue civilly to recover the money. The IAP Secretariat did not take any action to review completed files and make corrections once it was proven that many survivors had not received the compensation they deserved because of what a judge called Blott’s wrongful acts.There have been a number of other investigations into IAP lawyers. When allegations surfaced that Vancouver lawyer Stephen Bronstein employed Ivan Johnny, a convicted murderer, to sign up IAP clients, his practice was reviewed.Johnny was barred from further participating in the IAP and had his parole revoked, after claimants said he threatened them with bodily harm and allegedly stole compensation money.Hearings to review complaints made against Kenora lawyer Douglas Keshen will start up in early June.Additionally, the companies some lawyers used to recruit clients, called form fillers because of the complex, legalistic forms survivors were required to fill out to qualify for the IAP, were also accused of exploiting the former students.When Manitoba Court of Queen’s Bench Justice Perry Schulman ordered eight form-filling companies and six law firms to make “solemn declarations” to the court describing how they worked together, sources say the declarations were made.But almost two years after the deadline imposed by Justice Schulman, those declarations have not surfaced in the court file, meaning the public and media – and any interested survivors – are not able to see what was disclosed.Winnipeg lawyer Ken Carroll was investigated by Crawford after reports that a form filler he was affiliated with accompanied survivors to a bank, stood by while they deposited their cheques and then demanded payment for his services, which should have been included in the legal fees charged by Carroll.Angeconeb told the prime minister this all leaves the survivors with serious doubts as to whether justice has been done under the settlement agreement.“To further illustrate the need and significance of a review, survivors who are presently involved with complaints over some lawyers’ alleged actions of misconduct are legitimately asking – ‘What happens to those of us who are dealing with alleged unethical lawyers within Law Societies in terms of restitution – who will continue to monitor these kinds of unfinished business?” he wrote. “With or without a review process, the courts or the court monitors should reach out to all Law Societies and ask them to provide a list of all allegations made against lawyers that they are aware of. A status report should be available which would highlight the cases and provide the timing for resolution for each case. The IAP Secretariat should be made aware of these cases, if necessary, to ensure adjustments are made to the IAP process for the survivors. Will survivors be guaranteed restitution from wherever and whomever? Those survivors who have lodged complaints against lawyers feel re-victimized and they question, who is looking after their concerns: the government, the Adjudication Secretariat, the Law Societies?”There have been other incidents that have survivors questioning if they received the full benefit of the settlement agreement.Such as the role of Crawford, retained by the court to act as the court’s monitor of the process and investigate complaints. The money to pay Crawford comes out of the settlement agreement administration budget. Crawford was ordered by BC Supreme Court Justice Brenda Brown to repay to the federal government close to a million dollars for “questionable costs” incurred during the investigation of Stephen Bronstein.And, a federal government official admitted there was miscommunication with government lawyers that allowed the Catholic Church to escape paying close to $25-million that it had committed in the settlement agreement to raise to pay for healing programs for survivors.Ron Kidd, a gay-rights activist who lives in Vancouver, took it upon himself to read the IRSSA and check to see if the church had met its commitments.“When I twice wrote the [Indigenous Affairs] ministry in 2007 asking if the churches had actually paid their share, I did not receive a reply.  I asked [Hedy Fry] my member of Parliament, a former cabinet minister, to ask the ministry if they had paid, but it did not reply to her either,” he said.For several years Kidd was unable to get an answer to his inquiries.“In late 2013, the ministry responded to a follow-up on my member of parliament’s 2007 enquiry if the [church] had met their obligations by not answering the question.  In early 2014 it wrote me that the [church] had not met their financial obligations.  It was its first public admission of its continuous failure over a seven year period.”Kidd then approached Globe and Mail reporter Gloria Galloway, who discovered that the government error had allowed the church to escape its obligation to raise the $25 million.“When the Globe and Mail published its article about the financial obligations in early 2015, I learned that the Roman Catholic Church had fundraised less than $1 million of its fundraising obligation,” he told APTN Investigates.On May 5, 2016, Charlie Angus, the NDP-MP for Timmins-James Bay, submitted a written question to the government related to this matter. The government is required to provide Opposition MPs with a response to such questions within 45 sitting days of Parliament. So it will take at least until the fall for the information to come out.Question Q-2052 asks the Trudeau government the following questions:“With respect to the Indian Residential Schools Settlement Agreement: with regard to the monitoring and reporting by the government of financial commitments of the Catholic Church, how much of the $29-million in cash donations owed was given to the survivors, how much of the $25-million dollars that was supposed to be fundraised, was fundraised, and of that money how much was donated to the survivors, what was the line-by-line account for the $25-million of in kind donations, how much of the total compensation owed was not distributed to survivors, as it was considered an expense, legal cost, or administrative fee of the Church, did government lawyers negotiate with other churches in order to waive their legal obligations, and, if so, when did these negotiations occur?”In January of this year, a Saskatchewan court ruling confirmed that Canada was on the hook for another $25-million.Canada had sued Merchant Law Group (MLG) of Regina, seeking to regain the $25-million it had committed to pay the law firm for its unpaid legal work on one of the class-action lawsuits that pressured the federal government to sign the settlement agreement.Lawyer Tony Merchant became a familiar figure at survivors’ gatherings across the country in the late ’90s and early 2000s as he signed up as many as 8,000 clients for the lawsuit.When the IRSSA was finalized, lawyers who had worked on the understanding that they receive nothing until a class action settlement was secured, sat down with the government to seek payment for those efforts.But Merchant’s billings raised the suspicions of Frank Iacobucci, a retired Supreme Court of Canada justice who had been retained to be the federal representative in the negotiation of the IRSSA.Canada signed the IRSSA with a clause that allowed it to require proof from Merchant that showed it had indeed done at least $25 million worth of work on the file.After Merchant’s database was disclosed, Justice Canada lawyers filed suit, alleging that the firm had committed “fraud, fraudulent misrepresentation and deceit” during the negotiation of IRSSA.But Saskatchewan Court of Queen’s Bench Justice Brian A. Barrington-Foote cited an earlier case where another Saskatchewan judge had decided years earlier that Merchant was entitled to at least $25 million for its efforts leading up to the IRSSA being signed.Barrington-Foote, on Jan. 20, struck out Canada’s statement of claim, ruling it was an abuse of process because the matter had already been argued and decided in the earlier case.The judge ruled that Canada should not have entered into the IRSSA if it was so concerned about the legitimacy of Merchant’s billings.“Canada nonetheless chose to make that bargain. It did so in order to conclude the settlement despite its serious concerns as to the ‘accuracy and veracity’ of Merchant’s representations,” he wrote.The allegations made by Canada may or may not be true. Survivors may never know for sure because this case has been thrown out of court. But they still wonder if the law firm didn’t profit unduly from their suffering.Shortly before we learned of Angeconeb’s call for an independent review of the IRSSA, APTN Investigates learned that the secretariat is currently engaged in an internal review in several locations across the country.“As part of the wind down and completion of the program, [the Indian Residential School Adjudication Secretariat] is undertaking a final report which will document the history of the process, the extent to which the IAP met its objectives, and the impact that the IAP has had on the lives of residential school survivors,” a government document states.Angeconeb was asked if he trusts the government to review itself. He insists allowing the IAP Secretariat to assess its own performance is not going to be enough to satisfy survivors.“Well, I’m not sure if I’d allow Colonel Sanders to babysit my chickens,” he said. “I think that’s why, in terms of the review itself, the courts really need to look at it, the agreement being so legalistic. I think it should be the courts that should order the review along with the terms of reference to ensure neutrality because right now we’re going to go into that Colonel Sanders scenario. Already there’s a lot of mistrust with this.”APTN Investigates asked Dan Shapiro, who succeeded Dan Ish as chief IAP adjudicator, for his reaction to Angeconeb’s letter. He responded in a written, emailed statement.“Many of the issues that [Angeconeb] raises in his letter are beyond the mandate of the Independent Assessment Process (IAP),” he wrote. “As chief adjudicator in the IAP, I know that it is impossible to design a perfect system that will satisfy all claimants.”He said more than 34,000 claims of abuse have been dealt with.“As in any adjudicative system, not all claims meet the criteria of the IAP.  Hence some claims are dismissed.  However, the vast majority of these cases are resolved in favour of former students on terms that are supported by all participants.  More than $3 billion in compensation has been paid out to former students.  We expect to complete the lion’s share of hearings in the IAP this spring,” he added.The secretariat is not alone in administering the IRSSA and oversight has been provided all the way through the process, he wrote.“It’s important to remember that the IAP was developed and approved by all parties to the 2007 Indian Residential Schools Settlement, including the Assembly of First Nations, counsel for former students and the Government of Canada. The Settlement Agreement, of which the IAP is a part, was the product of extensive negotiations brokered by retired Supreme Court of Canada Justice Frank Iacobucci.”He said the IRSSA has been supervised by several judges as well.“Finally, it’s important to remember that the IAP is a court supervised process.  As chief adjudicator, I report at regular intervals to the nine supervising judges, who are also actively engaged in ensuring that the IAP delivers the benefits to former students that it was intended to do.   In addition to the extraordinary checks and balances built in to this adjudication process, the courts retain the ultimate authority to provide redress in the event that they are of the view that an injustice may have occurred in individual cases,” he wrote.Angeconeb believes there was one thing that complicated all that oversight.“It was very political,” he said. “A lot went wrong. But the thing is, we could have learned from those mistakes as other processes are on the horizon such as the inquiry into missing and murdered women. The 60s scoop issue is just on the horizon as well. So I think there’s a bit of a coverup going on here.He said there are still too many unanswered questions to accept that all of the oversight mentioned by the chief adjudicator guaranteed a flawless and completely fair process.“There remain a million unanswered questions. What’s going on? Is there a coverup going on? In this case the voice of the weakened, in the case the voice of survivors has to be listened to,” he said. “The word I’m hearing is 25 years ago when the disclosures started coming out, we were victims. Twenty-five years later, now we are re-victimized. It’s a very common quote around here.”After many years where politicians, lawyers and bureaucrats were in charge, he believes there’s one thing that should have been done all along and it’s not too late to do it.“I think the courts, as their last ‘do good,’ should look at a process where they actually develop terms of reference and even appoint those that would be very instrumental in providing a review with key stakeholders like survivors on board,” he said.last_img read more

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