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Ospreys prop Cai Griffiths signs for London Irish

first_imgLondon Irish director of rugby, Brian Smith said: “Cai is very solid at the set piece which is crucial when signing a tight head prop. He is a direct replacement for Faan Rautenbach who is leaving London Irish after seven years service. We look forward to welcoming Cai to the Club.”Cai Griffiths said: “Joining London Irish offers me the chance to test myself in a gruelling Aviva Premiership competition week in, week out. It is a challenge I am certainly looking forward to and one I am relishing. I have enjoyed nine fantastic years at the Ospreys and would like to thank the players and coaching staff for all their help during my time there.” TAGS: London IrishOspreys Versitile prop Cai Griffiths can play at both tighthead and looseheadLONDON IRISH has signed Ospreys tight head prop forward Cai Griffiths.Griffiths, who can also operate at loose head, has made over 100 appearances for the Welsh province, competing in the Rabo Direct Pro 12, LV and Heineken Cups.The front rower, who stands 188cm and weighs 120kgs, was part of the Ospreys side that won the Celtic League in 2005 and Magners League in 2007 and 2009. The 28 year-old English qualified player, was under the tutelage of Wales and British and Irish Lions tight head, Adam Jones, and has developed into a powerful scrummager and key lineout lifter. He is also very effective in the loose and possesses very good handling skills.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS LEICESTER, ENGLAND – OCTOBER 11: Cai Griffiths, the Ospreys prop, looks on during the Heineken Cup match between Leicester Tigers and Ospreys at Welford Road on October 11, 2009 in Leicester, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images)last_img read more

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This weekend’s talking points

first_imgOkay, so both sides like an offload, make breaks and lead the try-scoring charts in the Aviva Premiership. However, Exeter only halted a slide of five consecutive losses at home against London Welsh last week and they are facing a team welcoming back the league’s top marksman, Nick Evans.Harlequins will want to stay a step ahead of the rest, being only a point clear of Saracens at the top of the Premiership, but they have been beaten by Chiefs already this season and they do give up tries.Away from the scoring and the flash passing, seeing Tom Hayes facing off against the second-row pairing of George Robson and Nick Easter, making his second appearance of the season in the engine room, could be entertaining enough.Storming: Can the Stormer cross the line against the Sharks?A Super Shark Storm (17:10)Before Super Rugby kicked off the Stormers were being touted as possible winners of the whole kit and caboodle. Then they met the Bulls and Morne Steyn while they were in the mood.On Saturday afternoon, the Stormers will again run out away from home, this time into the shark tank of the Kings Park Stadium. The home side have already won a tight game last week against the Cheetahs and it will worry Stormers that the Sharks have already developed a taste for flesh…Expect at least a single drop of blood.SundayPoor admin, poor Welsh  (14:15)It is bad enough that London Welsh have a hearing looming, as they face a potential points deduction for fielding an ineligible player – Tyson Keats – for several games. However, the next game they have after getting possibly disastrous news comes against the bullies of the league, Saracens. Sarries will know how many points they are behind Quins before this game, while Welsh will have to put their problems behind them and turn over Messrs Brits, Borthwick, Fraser, Hodgson, Strettle, and Tompkins.Their position in the league is starting to look a little bit slippy. EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND – FEBRUARY 24: Flyhalf Paddy Jackson of Ireland kicks at goal during the RBS Six Nations match between Scotland and Ireland at Murrayfield Stadium on February 24, 2013 in Edinburgh, Scotland. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Caught in the middle: Tyson Keats playing for London Welsh has thrown up problems. He starts against Saracens.By Alan DymockEVERY TIME we head to the pub with our mates there is a sort of social one-upmanship where every party has to demonstrate that they know more than the other, that they have their finger on the pulse.With rugby it is no different, especially when there is no RBS 6 Nations to lean against. There are talking points out there and if you time it just right and keep abreast of the rugby schedule, you can keep one step ahead of those dullards you call friends.Friday nightPaddy Jackson’s development  (19:05)Punt practice, Paddy: Jackson kicks at goalThe Ulster fly-half started his first game for Ireland on Sunday, but despite a strong showing on the hoof his kicking was wayward. He missed goal and he missed touch. His boot looked rusty.So in his international week off he is afforded a run out for his province against Treviso in the RaboDirect Pro12, trotting out against the Italian outfit and given the kicking duty – something that normally is handed to scrum-half Ruan Pienaar – in the hope that he can discover some form before Ireland play France in next week’s return to 6 Nations action.West (Country) is best  (20:00)Not only will Bath v Gloucester be your typical West Country slobber knocker, but there are a lot of stars returning for this clash.While Mike Tindall looks to play his 150th game for the Cherry and Whites, Freddie Burns looks to run off that knee injury that prevented him from joining the England squad. Wales’ Paul James returns for Bath beside England returnee David Wilson, and Matt Banahan earns reinstatement at the same time as captain Francois Louw.SaturdayCan Chiefs turn over Quins?  (15:15)last_img read more

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Lions 2013: Five potential squad weaknesses

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Staying in France: Jonny Wilkinson’s unavailability has left the Lions short but he could join the tour at a later date1. Lack of fly-half coverThe most glaring omission from Tuesday’s squad announcement was the lack of cover at fly-half. With Jonny Wilkinson admitting that it could be a tour too far for his battered body and needing to fulfil contractual responsibilities at Toulon, the Lions coaches have risked selecting just two No 10s. Greig Laidlaw was an option to cover both half-back positions, and consummate utility back James Hook could have covered fly-half and virtually half the backline, but they were both deemed surplus to requirements. It has been mooted that Stuart Hogg, richly talked up by the Lions management, may be asked to cover there, starting against the BaaBaas in Hong Kong. However, with very little, if any, top-level experience in a key role, it’s quite a burden to put on a 20-year-old.2. Front-row gamblesThere was an audible gasp when the name of Matt Stevens was announced by Tour manager Andy Irvine. The South African, naturalised Englishman, has quite a story. A Test Lion by 2005, he followed it with an adept X-Factor turn, a two-year ban for cocaine, the opening of a coffee shop and now finally redemption at Saracens. Tipping the scales at over 20st, he is still a sizeable ball-carrier, can play on both sides of the scrum and has World Cup pedigree, but nevertheless, it is still a roll of the dice for someone who hasn’t played international rugby for 15 months. His young colleague Mako Vunipola is also far from the finished product in the scrummaging department as Adam Jones proved when teaching the 22 year-old a valuable lesson in their Six Nations encounter.Big risk: Stevens is the shock call-up3. One left wing PERPIGNAN, FRANCE – APRIL 26: James Hook of Perpignan kicks a penalty during the Amlin Challenge Cup Semi Final between Perpignan and Stade Francais at Stade Aime Giral on April 26, 2013 in Perpignan, France. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) On the flank, there are three recognised international right-wings; Tommy Bowe, Alex Cuthbert and Sean Maitland, and a solitary left-wing, George North, who only moved sides when Shane Williams hung up his size 7s. While modern-day players are expected to be interchangeable, in the high-pressure Test match environment, a nano-second of hesitation, whether it’s poor positioning or a sloppy kick on a weaker foot, could heap unnecessary pressure on the Lions. Leigh Halfpenny has played there for Wales, but he is expected to be deployed as a full-back. Simon Zebo, the owner of a cultured left boot, was mentioned in dispatches by Warren Gatland and can expect to be on standby.4. Route one midfieldSave for the ‘dainty’ Brian O’Driscoll, who in the latter years of his career has, at times, resembled an extra backrow, the Lions midfield is replete with intimidating physical specimens. Manu Tuilagi, Jonathan Davies, and Jamie Roberts are all over 6ft and 16st. They can thump holes into the most robust of defences and bring attackers to a shuddering halt, but lack a certain trickery and cunning. Gatland has said Tuilagi and Roberts have a limited kicking games, and Jonathan Davies was the first to castigate himself for a few errant passes after a poor game against Ireland. If O’Driscoll is not at his creative best, there is the lack of an artiste if route one is not working. The omission of James Hook and Billy Twelvetrees, who both offer vision, a varied kicking game and soft hands could be at best, foolhardy, at worst, fatal. Multi-talented: Hook is the perfect utility back5. Wrecking-ball No. 8Are the Lions missing a No 8 with the ability to skittle over the opposition and put them on the front foot? In 2001, they had behemoth Scott Quinnell to do the job, a man adept at dragging in defenders to release attackers. In 2005, a young Ryan Jones joined the tour late to wreak havoc on All Black playing fields. On this tour, Toby Faletau and Sean O’Brien are the closest the Lions have to destructive ball-carriers in the backrow but you seldom see attackers knocked on their behinds, in the way as someone like Gloucester’s Ben Morgan does. Granted, it’s a minor point, but even minor points can prove the difference in a Test Series.last_img read more

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Face-Off: Does Rugby Need An Orange Card?

first_img Face-Off: Does Rugby Need An Orange Card?PAUL WILLIAMSRugby World online columnistThe game can’t cope with another rule change. Other than Donald Trump’s weave, there are few things more complex. Yet an orange card is required to maintain rugby’s appeal.Historically, yellow cards were dished out for misdemeanours and red cards reserved for incidents that fell outside the laws. Stamping, eye-gouging and neck-high tackles have never been part of rugby and justified a red card. However, rugby is now delivering red cards where the outcome is entwined with an opponent’s body angle or positioning. Professional rugby is a game of small margins and a red card makes victory impossible for the affected team.The inevitable mismatch caused also creates commercial pressures. If a red card occurs in the opening minutes, consumers literally switch off – with implications for advertising revenue.An orange card is the solution. Orange cards should place a player in the sin-bin for 20 minutes. Enough time to damage the offending team’s chances of winning – but not enough to render the result a formality. ALAN PEAREYRugby World writer Orange area?Benjamin Fall’s red card for this was later rescinded (Getty Images) Paul Williams and Alan Pearey discuss whether rugby needs an orange card in the game. Want to weigh in on this debate? Follow Rugby World on Facebook and Twitter to let us know where you stand.This article originally appeared in Rugby World’s September edition. It’s easy to sympathise with a player sent off for a technical misjudgement, such as Elliot Daly for taking out Argentina’s Leonardo Senatore in the air in 2016. But that doesn’t lessen the pain for the victim of that mistake as he clatters to the ground.The zero-tolerance approach to dangerous tackles or aerial challenges was a measured response to injury research. In striving for a safer game, World Rugby realise that only severe sanctions will do. Otherwise, why would a player pay attention to it? It’s like giving a drunk driver a ticking-off and a £50 fine – it’s not enough to make them change their behaviour.An orange card would fudge the issue in incidents of foul play, giving referees a soft option when they need to be firm. It would increase confusion in a game craving more simplicity. It would send the wrong message.And red cards shouldn’t be viewed as an automatic match-killer. England won that game in which they lost Daly, and earlier this year Racing, Leinster and Edinburgh are just three other teams to have won big games following an early dismissal. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Jack Willis on life in lockdown

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Jack Willis on life in lockdownAdversity and unpredictable challenges are part and parcel with a career in rugby. When sport was quite rightly put on hold during these strange and challenging times, it took some getting used to.I was immediately faced with an overriding feeling of uncertainty and, like many others, questioned, ‘What do I do now?’ It was a feeling I had experienced only too well before in my career with Wasps.At the end of the 2017-18 season I was selected to go on tour to South Africa with England, an incredible opportunity for me in my ‘breakthrough season’. However, after sustaining an injury to my ankle against Saracens just nine days later I was sitting on a hospital bed, with my left ankle in a boot and right knee in a brace, thinking, ‘What am I going to do if I don’t come back from this?’Big blow: Jack Willis is taken off after his injury in 2018 (Getty Images)It is hard to separate rugby from your ‘everyday life’ as the daily structure of a player affects every aspect of life, including what you eat, wear, think and when you can train or live your normal life. It means that you only have a sense of normality during our scheduled off-season.PRE-ORDER RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE’S 60TH ANNIVERSARY ISSUE (JUL-20) HEREThe injury caught me at a time where I was consumed in the ‘rugby bubble’ and showed me how quickly the most integral part of your life can be taken away from you, ultimately changing your life in an instant.While it was a difficult time, the injury gave me a bit of perspective and taught me the fundamental importance of achieving a better work-life balance moving forwards. In order for me to take full advantage of this time, I’ve found it crucial to maintain a form of structure to my day, taking inspiration from playing. I set the agenda for when to wake up, eat, train and ensure that I put time aside for interests outside of rugby to ensure I am as productive as possible.Without a structure or purpose to each day, I believe that this time that we have on our hands will be gone before we know it and I wanted to ensure I was able to be as productive as possible before I got back to the season and training.Getting to this mentality hasn’t come without difficulties and through the experience, I’ve found that I really struggle to motivate myself to train if I leave it until later in the day but I find that training first thing is the best way to start my day. It makes me feel more productive and energised and allows me to focus my mind on my agenda.Not having my team-mates around to laugh and joke with, or coaches to motivate me has been a real change. Now it’s just me, a pair of boots and any patch of grass big enough to run on.Since my injury, I have pursued an interest in property, and have recently launched my own property finance and search agency business, RockCap, with former team-mate Alex Lundberg, sourcing opportunities for investors, funds and developers.As team-mates you have to be open and honest with each other, able to take constructive criticism and advice, bring the best out of your game, and have a positive impact on the wider team and we have taken this off the pitch to set us in good stead for a strong business partnership.Starting your own business can see you faced with different challenges; through rugby I have learnt to deal with adversity head-on which has benefitted me enormously in these first few months.Good shout: Jack Willis celebrates scoring a try against Saracens earlier this season (Getty Images)I am constantly seeking new opportunities to expand my knowledge and talk to experienced property professionals and the lockdown has provided me with the opportunity to invest more time into the business. I’ve been fortunate to talk to some very experienced people from across the sector in the West Midlands who I’m looking forward to working with during and after lockdown.Investing time in my business has already been hugely rewarding, enabling me to also further my skill-set through online courses with Open Learn on Asset Allocation in Investment. So far, the courses have given me a great insight into different portfolio models and asset classes.The rugby community helps bring people together and through Wasps I have already been able to expand my network. I feel this work sits perfectly in supporting the creation of a better work-life balance alongside my rugby, giving me a different focus outside of the training ground, leading me to become more relaxed, and allowing me to have a clear head building up to training and games.It’s exciting to bring together my passions for rugby and business, and to be heading into the new phase with a former team-mate. I’m really looking forward to getting back with the team once the lockdown has lifted and continuing to strive to improve both on and off the field. Since I regained my fitness, I have loved every minute of training and playing, not only because of how much I missed it, but because of my new-found balance. This has allowed me to remain focused on things outside of rugby during the pandemic, which has significantly helped me mentally.There are two ways we can look at the adversity we face during this lockdown: as a boring and frustrating experience or an opportunity to grow and learn. TAGS: Wasps center_img Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Focus: Jack Willis has been working on his business as well as his rugby during lockdown (Getty Images) The Wasps back-row talks about how he’s learnt to strike the right work-life balancelast_img read more

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El Título IV sigue provocando debate

first_imgEl Título IV sigue provocando debate Los recientes cambios de la Convención a los cánones disciplinarios son parte de una larga trayectoria. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA center_img Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ [Episcopal News Service] Los cánones de la Iglesia Episcopal han expresado preocupación por la conducta del clero desde que la Convención General de 1789 determinó que era incorrecto para los clérigos -salvo “para sus honestas necesidades”- “frecuentar tabernas u otros lugares propensos a prestarse a la licencia”.Ese original Canon 13 también advertía que los clérigos que “se dedicaran a oficios bajos o serviles, o a beber o alborotar, o a malgastar su tiempo ociosamente” enfrentarían toda una serie de acciones disciplinarias.Desde entonces la Iglesia ha estado refinando su respuesta a la pregunta de cuál es la mejor manera de disciplinar a un clérigo descarriado. La tradición ha llegado hasta la 77ª. Reunión de la Convención General cuando obispos y diputados alteraron la versión actual del Título IV de los cánones disciplinarios que han estado en vigor por poco más de un año. Y aún bien podrían presentarse más cambios.Los ajustes de 2012, llevados a cabo por vía de la Resolución A033, conllevaban fundamentalmente el esclarecimiento de ciertas definiciones, así como el perfeccionamiento y la aclaración de partes del proceso.Sin embargo, la reunión de los obispos y los diputados del 5 al 12 de julio en Indianápolis también instruyó a la Comisión Permanente sobre Constitución y Cánones de la Iglesia a emprender una revisión completa en el curso de los próximos tres años de la implementación del Título IV. La Resolución C049, propuesta por la Diócesis de Albany, orienta a la comisión permanente a determinar “la medida en que los elementos de seguridad, veracidad, restauración y reconciliación están surtiendo efecto” tal como se propuso en primer lugar en la resolución de 2006 (A153), que autorizó el trabajo que dio lugar a la actual iteración.La Convención también convino con la solicitud de la Diócesis de Florida Central (en la Resolución C116) en revisar la constitucionalidad de dos cláusulas del Título IV de la Constitución y Cánones. Una de ellas le otorga al obispo primado la autoridad de restringir el ministerio de un obispo diocesano por una supuesta ofensa sin contar con el consentimiento del comité permanente de la diócesis o, en el caso de una supuesta deserción, sin el consentimiento de los tres obispos de mayor antigüedad en la Iglesia, tal como exigía la versión anterior del Título IV.La otra conlleva lo que se ha percibido como una violación del Artículo IX del Título IV en la Constitución de la Iglesia, que dice que los presbíteros y diáconos “serán juzgados por un Tribunal instituido por la Convención de la Diócesis”. Algunas diócesis, entre ellas la de Florida Central, han cuestionado si la Convención General puede prescribir un sistema denominacional para disciplinar al clero diocesano ya que -arguyen- el Artículo IX asigna esa autoridad a las diócesis. Tal sistema denominacional ha existido por lo menos desde 1994.Los redactores de la versión actual del Título IV, que entró en vigor el 1 de julio de 2011, siempre previeron la necesidad de cambios.“Uno no puede instituir el alcance de los cambios para el nuevo Título IV sin modificaciones que necesitan elaborarse”, dijo Diane Sammons, canciller de la Diócesis de Newark, que acaba de concluir un período de seis años en la comisión de Constitución y Cánones (los últimos tres como su presidente), en una entrevista reciente con el Servicio de Prensa Episcopal (ENS, por su sigla en inglés). “Todo el mundo [en la comisión] entendió eso y todo el mundo que trabajó con el Título IV entiende que no va a salir a la perfección en el primer borrador y que vamos a tener que seguir dándole vida y aliento y haciéndole cambios en tanto se mantenga, esperemos, fiel a los conceptos y a la teología que lo respalda”.Steve Hutchinson, canciller de la Diócesis de Utah que presidió el comité legislativo sobre los cánones de la Cámara de Diputados durante la Convención, se manifestó de acuerdo, añadiendo que “sabemos que probablemente no los lograremos todos y que habrán unos cuantos más, y quizás algunos en los que nadie ha pensado todavía” -que se previeron perfeccionamientos, aunque “no grandes cambios drásticos de dirección o de filosofía”.Sammons agregó que mantener un equilibrio entre el perfeccionamiento de los cánones mientras siguen siendo fieles a su nuevo espíritu “va a ser el reto”.Parte de las dificultades provienen de que al menos a algunos episcopales les disgusta el Título IV revisado.Algunas objeciones al Título IV revisado“Desde el punto de vista del procedimiento es un desastre. En lo que respecta a los derechos de los clérigos, es más que un desastre”, dijo a ENS Michael Rehill, diputado suplente de la Diócesis de Newark. “Necesitaba una revisión básica total. Se aprobó aceleradamente sin que nadie al parecer tuviera una idea de cómo realmente iba a funcionar en algunos aspectos”.En otros aspectos, insiste Rehill, los redactores sabían exactamente lo que estaban haciendo. Él dice que su intento fue quitarles “todos los derechos a los clérigos” y darles “un increíble poder a los obispos para deshacerse de los sacerdotes”.Rehill, ex canciller de la Diócesis de Newark, es el principal funcionario operativo del Abogado Canónico, que defiende a los clérigos episcopales en asuntos disciplinarios.Y el Rdo. Canónigo Christopher Seitz, el Rdo. Dr. Philip Turner, el Rdo. Dr. Ephraim Radner y el abogado Mark McCall, en un artículo para el Instituto de la Comunión Anglicana, se han opuesto sistemáticamente al Título IV revisado en algunas de sus aplicaciones. En octubre de 2011, llamaron al Título IV “un mal canon que está siendo mal implementado”. Pidieron su revocación y un regreso a la versión anterior, que según dijeron “ofrece un juicio justo y adecuado a los acusados, no expande inconstitucionalmente los poderes del Obispo Primado, y en particular lo entienden las personas encargadas de administrarlo”.El resumen de las objeciones de los cuatro hombres apuntan al quid de la disputa sobre el Título IV. Su primera inquietud tiene que ver con el cambio teológico en la revisión, la segunda está relacionada con el cambio en la disciplina de los obispos y la última podría atribuírsele al hecho de que la Iglesia está aún aprendiendo a implementar el nuevo Título IV.Poco después de que los cuatro dieran a conocer sus objeciones, Hutchinson se unió a Duncan Bayne, vicecanciller de la Diócesis de Olympia, y a Joseph Delafield, canciller de la Diócesis de Maine, para publicar un documento que dijeron “establece de manera concluyente la constitucionalidad” del Título IV.Cómo la Iglesia logró el nuevo Título IVLa inquietud sobre el debido proceso expresada por los escritores del Instituto, por Rehill y por otros es el fruto de importantes cambios en la filosofía y el enfoque que se reflejan en el Título IV revisado. La simiente de estos cambios se remonta por lo menos al año 2000 cuando la Convención General pidió que un equipo de trabajo evaluara el modo en que la Iglesia disciplinaba al clero a través del Título IV y otros métodos.En ese tiempo la versión actual del Título IV había estado vigente por sólo cuatro años, aprobada por la Convención General en 1994 y puesta en vigor dos años más tarde, [se trataba de] un sistema basado en el código de justicia militar de las Fuerzas Armadas de EE.UU. (la versión actual puede consultarse aquí). La versión 1994-96 del Título IV se originó en una oleada de casos de conducta sexual impropia en el clero episcopal que data por lo menos de 1986.Esa versión del Título IV buscó darle claridad y uniformidad (incluido un sistema judicial uniforme) a los procesos disciplinarios que en gran medida habían sido dejados a discreción de las diócesis individuales, reportó ENS en un comunicado de prensa de septiembre de 1994. Los cánones denominacionales, que no habían sufrido cambios desde su creación en 1915, fueron concebidos para tratar fundamentalmente con problemas de herejía y doctrina, informaba ENS.Hasta los años setenta, los casos de mala conducta del clero se arreglaban en privado entre los obispos y los clérigos acusados, dijo a ENS, en ese tiempo, Robert Royce, ex canciller de la Diócesis de Long Island y autor principal de la resolución del Comité Permanente sobre Constitución y Cánones.Sammons hizo notar durante su entrevista con ENS que la Iglesia Episcopal fue aplaudida en 1994 “porque se apareció con un sistema disciplinario que era sensato. Y eso era de máxima importancia en ese tiempo. Eso nos dio credibilidad. Nos dio un sistema que apoyaba a las víctimas, especialmente a las mujeres, dando un paso al frente de una manera que otras iglesias e instituciones aún no lo han hecho”, ya sea a favor de las mujeres o los niños.Sin embargo, para el año 2000, el Título IV había sido criticado porque se le percibía como “demasiado militarista y rígido en su aplicación” y porque “carecía de un fundamento teológico”. En consecuencia, la Convención pidió una revisión del Título IV.Teniendo en cuenta la teología de la disciplinaEn el informe del Equipo de Trabajo sobre Política y Procedimiento Disciplinario a la reunión de Convención en 2003, los miembros se preguntaron cómo la misión de la Iglesia de reconciliación del pueblo de Dios y de unos con otros en Cristo podía interpretarse en los cánones para “incluir esa nota esencial y seguir manteniendo responsables a los ofensores de una manera significativa”. El equipo de trabajo llegó a la conclusión de que la Iglesia necesitaba “comenzar de nuevo con el Título IV” porque “no sería posible llevar a cabo lo que esperábamos para nosotros mismos aún si hacíamos importantes ajustes al Título IV tal como existe al presente”.[El equipo] le encargó a la Rda. Pamela Cooper-White un ensayo titulado “Algunas ideas al objeto de la revisión canónica: los cánones como don de la Gracia y danza del amor” (que se encuentra en el informe del equipo de trabajo en el Libro Azul de 2003). El equipo de trabajo lo llamó un “catalizador para ulteriores conversaciones en la Iglesia sobre la teología de la disciplina”. Cooper-White, sacerdote episcopal que ahora enseña en el Seminario Teológico de Columbia en Decatur, Georgia, sugirió que el derecho canónico es “una expresión dada por Dios del interés por las normas eclesiásticas que se fundan no meramente en la restricción del mal (como suele ser el caso en el derecho secular), sino que se centran en la creación de una comunidad en la cual se respalda a todos los miembros a vivir una vida basada en el deseo de Dios, y en la alegría de estar en armonía con la bondad original de la creación de Dios”.El equipo de trabajo solicitó, y recibió, la autorización para proseguir su trabajo en el trienio 2003-2006, pero advirtió que acaso no podría llevar a cabo, en el curso de esos tres años, los cambios radicales que contemplaba realizar.En efecto, el equipo de trabajo propuso a la Convención de 2006 un Título IV completamente revisado, que su presidente [del equipo] la obispa de Indianápolis, Catherine Waynick, dijo en ese momento que “recobra[ba] el significado más amplio de disciplina como desarrollo de hábitos que puedan formar a todos los miembros de la Iglesia en ministerios sanos y responsables y que puedan producir reconciliación y restauración cuando ocurran fallos”.La revisión propuesta alejó el Título IV del modelo de justicia penal y lo orientó hacia un modelo basado en sistemas disciplinarios que se usan en otras profesiones, tales como médicos, abogados y asistentes sociales diplomados. Estos últimos modelos se caracterizan por la obligación de parte de los profesionales de cooperar con las investigaciones. En consecuencia, por ejemplo, ellos no pueden rehusar testificar en procedimientos disciplinarios pretextando invocar el derecho de la ley secular contra la autoincriminación.La Convención General rechazó la propuesta del equipo de trabajo de sujetar a ciertos líderes laicos al Título IV. Otros creyeron que los nuevos procesos eran demasiado complicados, especialmente para las diócesis pequeñas.Pero la Convención decidió seguir intentándolo. Aprobó la Resolución A153 para crear un nuevo equipo de trabajo, y le dio una lista de “objetivos, inquietudes y valores fundamentales”, incluido el de acercar el Título IV “a un modelo de reconciliación para todas las circunstancias apropiadas”, en el que se alentara la pronta resolución de los conflictos y la reconciliación de las personas “en el primer momento pertinente y en el nivel más bajo de la Iglesia que resultara adecuado”. Cualquier propuesta nueva tenía por objeto también “mantener el papel pastoral histórico y la autoridad canónica de los obispos” y respetar los “papeles, los derechos y la integridad” de las personas sujetas al Título IV y de “personas, comunidades, parroquias, misiones congregaciones y la Iglesia damnificadas”.En 2009, la Convención aprobó la versión actual del Título IV, que se basa, según su primer canon, en la premisa de que “la Iglesia y cada Diócesis apoyará a sus miembros en su vida en Cristo y procurará resolver los conflictos mediante la promoción de la restauración, el arrepentimiento, el perdón, la restitución, la justicia, la enmienda de vida y la reconciliación entre todas las partes comprometidas o afectadas”.El laicado no está sujeto al proceso disciplinario que bosqueja, pero la revisión codificaba el plan de 2006 de distanciar la disciplina clerical del modelo de justicia penal.Rehill dijo a ENS que en 2009, “los clérigos en la Convención General posiblemente no pudieron llegar a entender lo que realmente estaban haciendo”. Y agregó que la revisión se aprobó rápidamente “cuando la atención de la Convención estaba centrada en la Comunión Anglicana y en los problemas de la sexualidad humana”.La revisión “sencillamente se apresuró a venderse como la supresión del ‘legalismo’ del proceso disciplinario, al hacerlo más pastoral que legalista”, dijo él, para agregar que “no hay nada pastoral en absoluto en el nuevo Título IV”.Otros, entre ellos Hutchinson y Sammons, dicen que el proceso de nueve años de revisión del Título IV incluyó la solicitud de reacciones al laicado y al clero. Hutchinson afirmó que, especialmente desde 2008, el comité sobre Constitución y Cánones, y otros grupos “han brindado numerosas oportunidades y han pedido reacciones, críticas, sugerencias y cosas por el estilo a través de toda la Iglesia para que la gente interviniera en todo lo que creyera que podría mejorarse o que les pareciera mal, o cualquier cosa respecto al Título IV, y nunca tuvimos noticias de [Rehill]”.Un cambio de enfoqueHutchinson, que ha participado en las revisiones del Título IV, al menos desde 1994, y que “en verdad se ha dedicado bastante a la búsqueda de algo que creemos que serviría mejor a los legítimos intereses de la Iglesia”, dice que la versión actual expresa “en definitiva lo que somos como empresa, lo que representamos y la clase de sistemas, procesos y conceptos teológicos que sí tenemos y que reflejan esos intereses”.Sammons dijo que la versión actual equilibra aspectos de un modelo de conducta profesional “con una fuerte dosis de intentar administrar en cada paso del proceso un sentido de cuidado pastoral y de teología”.Ella le dijo a ENS que, pese a las objeciones acerca de la ausencia de un juicio justo, los clérigos resultarán beneficiados con los nuevos procedimientos. Si bien ya no tienen los “derechos penales” que les otorgaban en conformidad con el antiguo Título IV, ellos y las personas a quienes ellos puedan haber afectado no están sujetas a un proceso contencioso desde el mero principio.“Uno no quiere desalentar a personas que son realmente víctimas de tener una pronta y justa resolución a su problema”, afirmó ella. “Pero [el proceso] está realmente concebido para ver si hay en un modo de funcionar, en primer lugar, a través de la comunicación, sin un proceso punitivo, y eso es un beneficio para el clero”.Y respecto a la queja de que el clero ha perdido derechos, apunta Hutchinson, se basa en una serie de privilegios otorgados al clero sólo durante los últimos 16 años, desde la revisión de 1994 que entró en vigor en 1996. Sin embargo, reconoció Sammons, “si uno tiene un derecho, uno quiere conservarlo y aspira a más derechos. Uno no quiere que se lo quiten. Se trata de que no es instintivamente natural querer renunciar a derechos, incluso si a cambio estamos recibiendo algo tal vez más beneficioso”.El fundamento del empeño de revisar el enfoque de la Iglesia a la disciplina del clero que comenzó en 2000, dijo Sammons, fue “esa noción de que vivimos en comunidad y por tanto todos somos responsables los unos de los otros, y parte de nuestra responsabilidad cristiana es ser al mismo tiempo reconciliados”.El actual Título IV, agregó, conlleva el supuesto de que la reconciliación y la restauración “siempre deben ser parte del código disciplinario”.“Luego no debería limitarse a revelar el daño”, agregó. “Debería también restaurar a las personas a la comunidad, y eso incluye al clero, y nuestro sistema nunca le ha prestado atención a eso”.Vivir conforme al nuevo Título IV ha tenido algunos baches, reconocen tanto Hutchinson como Sammons.“Desafortunadamente, ha habido un pequeño número de casos que se han salido de control por causa de los demandados o de sus abogados, en particular por rehusar atenerse a los nuevas reglas y porque las personas encargadas del sistema disciplinario no se han dado cuenta de que tienen la autoridad para controlar y manejar los elementos del tiempo y los gastos del proceso más de lo que han estado haciéndolo”, apuntó Hutchinson.Y, por no haberse centrado en la reconciliación y la restauración, agregó él, el Título IV “va a seguir siendo una labor en progreso en la medida en que avanzamos y seguimos entendiendo las relaciones internas de la Iglesia y la disciplina, pero también lo que significa ser un foro de reconciliación para personas que han tenido problemas muy serios o que han perjudicado muy seriamente a otros”.— La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera del Servicio de Prensa Episcopal. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Knoxville, TN Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Aug 20, 2012 Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

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Learning to take it slow

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Linda Ryan says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments are closed. Janice M. Schuyler says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Smithfield, NC Learning to take it slow Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET October 17, 2012 at 5:35 pm It’s good if you can take all the time you need to heal. Many don’t have the luxury of that kind of time. For some of us, we have to get back to work or the bills don’t get paid becuase we don’t have jobs that give us benefits. At least some of us have jobs, which others don’t. THey have the time to heal but not the luxury of a period of recuperation where stress is minimal and healing is maximal.May your recovery be blip-less and steady.Kitty, 3-1/2 weeks post-surgery and back at work for the past 2-1/2 weeks. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Martinsville, VA October 18, 2012 at 9:50 am I am a retired priest no living in Central Massachusetts. Knowing yourself is key to this, knowing I tend to be driven, prior to my first surgery (and prior to ordination), I said to myself,during recovery time I need to ask myself: “Do I feel I am taking it too easy, too slowly.” If the answer is yes, then probably I am doing it just right. The day after ordination as a transitional deacon I had major surgery and a week later insisted on being deacon for Christmas Eve. I did it, but later realized how foolish I was. And, I realized I needed to get back in touch with some reality about myself that I did not want to lose as an ordained person. Sometimes learning from our mistaken perceptions is the only way some of us can learn. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Submit a Job Listing Alecia Moroz says: Submit an Event Listing [Religion News Service] When I alerted my readers that I would be taking time off from writing to recover from surgery, many sent me kind words with a common theme: “Take time to heal.”“Give your body time to heal,” said one. “Rest and sleep,” said another. “Be sure to take ALL the time you need for a full recovery!” and “Don’t try to power through. Stop, lie down and rest. … We will still be here.”I was hearing the wisdom of experience: been there, didn’t take the time, thought I was healed, wasn’t.That certainly has been my experience from previous times of loss and stress. I haven’t always taken enough time to heal. I moved on too soon, when my head, in effect, was still woozy.Even now, a week after surgery, I find my mind drifting off. I will be thinking through a sentence and find I have jumped tracks. I will need to read the same page of a novel several times and replay a scene in a recorded TV show.So this time I am taking time. No rushing back to work, no making important decisions, no feeling impatient to have my wits fully about me.I am revisiting earlier healing scenarios. After 9/11, for example, many wanted to seize control of the situation and begin making critical decisions. Partly, that was the inevitable fog of war; action needed to be taken. But some of our response was an unfortunate rush to reassert control, and a rush to escape the pain of loss and feeling helpless. The decisions that came out of that rush were poor.I remember a time when I had been pummeled in a job. Once out the door, I wanted to take control, get my life in order, be free of pain. I rushed it. Even though I tried to learn from the experience, I wanted the interim to end ASAP. Impatience led me to see things without sufficient clarity and to make decisions that weren’t wise. Looking back on it, my rush to escape the agony merely extended the agony.One way to assert control was to manage the flow of information. It’s better, I now realize, to be radically transparent.A second way was to play all roles myself. I would be patient, chronicler, therapist, and source of strength. I allowed my daily writings to go from the revelations of autobiographical discovery to self-obsession and self-justification. My writings became dull.This time, I am setting no internal stopwatch, imposing no expectations, not seeing this recovery time as an unfortunate pause before real life resumes. With the help of my extraordinary wife, I am allowing myself to move slowly, to focus on pain management, to take my medications as instructed, to let my body tell me when it’s time to extend my afternoon walk.Most difficult for me, and yet most critical, when I try to write and sense my mind clouding over, I close my laptop and turn to reading. For me, not writing is a bit like not breathing, but I know it’s part of getting healthy.I have made two discoveries: Giving up control is far more healing than trying to assert control.And people are amazingly kind. If given the opening to express concern and affection, they do so. I’m not sure what I expected. This surgery is a first for me. But I treasure what has come thus far: a calming and affirming tenderness.– Tom Ehrich is a writer, church consultant and Episcopal priest based in New York. He is the author of “Just Wondering, Jesus” and founder of the Church Wellness Project. His website is www.morningwalkmedia.com. Follow Tom on Twitter @tomehrich.Statements and opinions expressed in the articles and communications herein, are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Episcopal News Service or the Episcopal Church. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Jack H Haney says: October 17, 2012 at 6:25 pm Precisely the advice I have given. On 9/11 I had a spinal Laminectomy and Fusion, and on 9/13 a cardiac arrest and pneumonia developing out of it. After a WIERD week in CCU and further hospitalization, and over two weeks in a nursing home/rehab center, home is wonderful, but so are the necessary period of rest, going to bed early, and watching my diet and doing necessary PT and Occupational therapies. What used to be done quickly and unthinkingly is now dome slowly with intentionality of thought. There is also time for thought, contemplation and prayer. Reading is slower. And I am discovering what was once important is now less so. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN October 22, 2012 at 12:01 pm Okay, God, I got the message. Thank you for sending me so many wonderful messengers, including Tom, to get through my thick skull! I knew it was bad when I admitted to my spiritual director that I was looking forward to the time after my upcoming surgery, because I hoped to recapture that thin space I knew earlier this year when I was recovering from a nearly fatal acute and necrotizing pancreatitis attack. During that time, I had no choice but to be still and present in the moment. I was too sick to do otherwise. No one expected anything from me but to heal. More importantly, I didn’t expect anything else from me. Now, 7 months out from that attack, I am back to full swing, even though my body and my heart are telling me I’m not quite ready.When I woke up from my coma, I could feel God’s presence. At that moment, I knew, really knew for the first time in my life, that I didn’t need to do or be anything. I knew at the core of my being that I was a child of God and that was enough. That feeling stayed with me for a long, long time, but now I feel it being crowded out by the noise of daily life and the expectations that come with it.Thank you, God, for giving me a chance to recapture that thin space. Help me find the right balance of contemplation and activity to fulfill your will for my life. Help us all to remember your guiding wisdom as found in Isaiah 30:15 “In returning and rest, you shall be saved; in quietness and in trust shall be your strength.” (English Standard Version) Comments (4) Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By Tom EhrichPosted Oct 17, 2012 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab last_img read more

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Boys Home of Virginia hosts Teach a Man to Fish…

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Posted Sep 28, 2015 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Gabriel Wooldridge, a resident of Boys Home, getting a pointer from Dusty Sprague, fly-fishing instructor. Photo: Sarah Jones.[Boys Home of Virginia press release] Fly fishing is a lot like life – it may look easy but there’s a lot to learn.That’s why renowned fly-casting instructor Dusty Sprague and other enthusiasts gathered on the 1,400-acre campus of Boys Home of Virginia on Sept. 26 for Teach a Man to Fish, a first-ever event to introduce its residents to fly fishing – and other life lessons.“One of the ways we help our boys learn discipline and patience is by exposing them to the wonders of the natural world, so we’ve arranged to bring some of the world’s best known anglers to introduce the boys to the joys, art and skills of fly fishing,” said Donnie Wheatley, executive director of Boys Home. “Fly fishing teaches kids about themselves and the world around them, consistent with the values we instill – respect, wisdom, curiosity and responsibility.”Gabriel Wooldridge and a volunteer take to the creek nearby to try out the new-found skills. Photo: Sarah JonesBoys Home is a residential home for at-risk boys from throughout Virginia and from other states to transform their lives by teaching them independence, discipline and responsibility. The organization provides schooling, food, clothing, shelter and guidance, almost entirely privately financed by individuals and churches.“We give them the education they need, and lead them to become well-rounded men,” Wheatley said. “Teach a Man to Fish will teach our young men patience and the physical skills like eye-hand coordination to fly fish.”Sprague, Jacob Ott, director of outdoor pursuits with the Greenbrier Resort, and other volunteers first instructed the boys in the gym before setting out to fish on the campus pond (stocked with perch, redeye and small- and large-mouth bass) and nearby Dunlap Creek.“We’re very happy to help the boys either be introduced to this wonderful sport or be further educated about it,” Sprague said. “The skills of fly fishing are not easy to acquire. Fly casting is fairly simple but not easy to learn. Without some knowledgeable help, a person starting out alone can easily find the sport too difficult to pursue. The sport teaches one the skills of observation, self-discipline, patience, perseverance, respect for nature and other fishermen and our creator.”“Boys Home provides care for young men in a healthy, supportive environment,” said Kelly O’Keefe of Richmond, a member of the Boys Home board of trustees. “Teach a Man to Fish, along with our ongoing education and programs to mold their character, is just another way to reach our residents in new ways.”For more information, please visit www.boyshomeofva.org. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Boys Home of Virginia hosts Teach a Man to Fish event Renowned instructor Dusty Sprague introduces young men to art and skills of fly fishing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME last_img read more

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Japan’s Anglicans call for end to nuclear power

first_img Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Washington, DC G.R.L. Cowan says: Rector Smithfield, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Comments (2) M. J. Wise says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC March 4, 2016 at 10:55 am Why is that church lying? Is it somehow a ward of the Japanese state? Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Anglican Communion, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Posted Mar 3, 2016 Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Japan’s Anglicans call for end to nuclear power ‘Fukushima was warning from God’ Rector Knoxville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Advocacy Peace & Justice, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Tags March 3, 2016 at 4:08 pm “As Christians, we believe anything that threatens or violates lives must be stopped.”Really, anything? Sorry, I disagree. Life involves making smart choices about risk. Christians are not called to merely cower in a cave and die. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Asia Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Comments are closed. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Mopping the floors in schools close to Fukushima helps to remove radiation contamination carried in the air. Photo: Kay Ikezumi/United Society[United Society] On the fifth anniversary of the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake of 11 March 2011, the Anglican Church in Japan is reissuing its call for a world without nuclear power plants.The earthquake and subsequent tsunami caused devastation – claiming 15,893 lives, with 2,572 still missing – and triggered a nuclear disaster, with meltdowns in three reactors at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant.A 20km area around the power plant remains off limits due to contamination – and residents outside the exclusion zone are living in fear of radiation poisoning.Having worked with survivors of the disaster, the Nippon Sei Ko Kai (NSKK, Anglican Church in Japan) is calling on the Anglican Communion to join its call to put a stop to nuclear power.Kay Ikezumi, the secretary general of the NSKK project Let Us Walk Together Part II, which looks at nuclear power and radiation, said: “The true impact of the aftermath of the nuclear disaster is not widely known. We think the Japanese government wants to hide the reality from the Japanese people and from the world.“Before the disaster, many people thought nuclear power was necessary, but now many people are changing their minds.“It will take 40 to 50 years for the land to be decontaminated sufficiently for human habitation, and thousands of years more for complete decontamination.“Moreover, even today, the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant is producing about 500 tonnes of contaminated water every day, and it is becoming increasingly difficult to find places to safely deposit this.”All but two of Japan’s 54 nuclear plants are currently shut downJapan has 54 nuclear power plants, of which all but two were temporarily shut down following the nuclear disaster pending new safety measures.Mrs Ikezumi said: “NSKK has concluded that we need to decommission all nuclear power plants – we have managed perfectly well in Japan without them, although perhaps we will need to think about living simpler lives.“As Christians, we believe anything that threatens or violates lives must be stopped.”People living immediately outside the Fukushima exclusion zone fight a daily battle to combat radiation poisoning.The effects of contamination have caused an increase in children with thyroid cancer, (fortunately treatable), as well as malformed plants, trees and animals.Church is supporting children and the elderlyNSKK has been organising day trips and camps in safe areas of the countryside so children can run around outside without fear of contamination; research has shown that such activities help to reduce radioactive substances in the body.Other initiatives of NSKK include providing care for elderly people forced to relocate, including opportunities for socialising and exercise.Speaking this year, the Most Revd Nathanael Makoto Uematsu, Primate of NSKK, said: “Nuclear power plants are a danger; we cannot control this power when an accident occurs; the problem of re-processing spent nuclear fuel has been neglected.“We will continue to walk together with victims in the disaster areas. We ask everyone, please continue to pray for these victims.”In 2012, the 59th General Synod of NSKK issued this statement: “In solidarity with other denominations and faiths, we call for an immediate abolition of nuclear power plants and a conversion of Japan’s energy policy toward the development of alternative sources of energy.”The statement continues: “The accident . . . has posed a threat to people’s lives by disseminating radioactive substances, not only in the immediate vicinity but in a much wider area, thus revealing that nuclear power generation is extremely dangerous in itself.“It is not too much to say this is a warning from God to each of us who, having suffered from nuclear bombs, have failed to acquire sufficient knowledge about nuclear power and exposure to radiation.”Rachel Parry, the United Society’s director for global relations, said: “As citizens of the only nation to have suffered the impact and consequences of atomic bombs as an act of war, Christians in Japan have a lot to say about nuclear energy. And members of the Anglican Church in Japan, through their close engagement with communities after the Fukushima disaster five years ago, know through personal experience how dangerous and devastating nuclear accidents are.“With their evidence, they are showing the world that this technology brings death, through their knowledge they are asking us to listen, and with the sacrifice of their lives, they are prophets of peace.” Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DClast_img read more

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Litany for Gun Violence Prevention offered for use in Sunday…

first_img Advocacy Peace & Justice, Jed Holdorph says: Sandy Stone says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID June 14, 2016 at 4:40 pm This business of “Barack, our president” has a tone of affection and political endorsement that I think is inappropriate in a religious liturgy. Jose W. Mestre says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET June 17, 2016 at 6:25 pm I agree with you Charles. I too own guns that I use for sport and home protection. I agree that if someone want to shoot up a place, they will find a way to obtain the guns they want, and that is because they don’t have to necessarily buy them legally. We need to pray that this country starts to seriously address the issue of gun trafficking and the illegal guns that most criminals have easy access to. Pray that we get a President and Congress that is wise enough and tough enough to do that job. Pray for Illegal guns to be eliminated from our streets and our cities. Brother Tupper, TSSF says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Anne Ferguson says: Rick Lewis says: Rector Washington, DC Featured Events [Episcopal News Service] The following Litany for Gun Violence Prevention is written by the Rt. Rev. Stephen T. Lane, Episcopal bishop of Maine, and offered for use in liturgies throughout the Episcopal Church this coming Sunday or at any other time.The litany is available as downloadable bulletin inserts in English here and in Spanish here.A full Eucharistic liturgy, prepared by St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in St. Paul, Minnesota, is available here.Giver of Life and Love, you created all people as one family and called us to live together in harmony and peace. Surround us with your love as we face the challenges and tragedies of gun violence.For our dear ones, for our neighbors, for strangers and aliens, and those known to you alone, Loving God,Make us instruments of your peace.God of Righteousness, you have given our leaders, especially Barack, our President, the members of Congress, the judges of our courts and members of our legislatures, power and responsibility to protect us and to uphold our right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.For all who bear such responsibility, for all who struggle to discern what is right in the face of powerful political forces, Loving God,Make us instruments of your peace.God of Compassion, we give you thanks for first responders, for police officers, firefighters and EMTs, and all those whose duties bring them to the streets, the lobbies, the malls and the homes where the carnage of gun violence takes place day after day. Give them courage and sound judgment in the heat of the moment and grant them compassion for the victims.For our brothers and sisters who risk their lives and their serenity as they rush to our aid, Loving God,Make us instruments of your peace.Merciful God, bind up the wounds of all who suffer from gun violence, those maimed and disfigured, those left alone and grieving, and those who struggle to get through one more day. Bless them with your presence and help them find hope.For all whose lives are forever marked by the scourge of gun violence, Loving God,Make us instruments of your peace.God Who Remembers, may we not forget those who have died in the gun violence that we have allowed to become routine. Receive them into your heart and comfort us with your promise of eternal love and care.For all who have died, those who die today, and those who will die tomorrow, Loving God,Make us instruments of your peace.God of Justice, help us, your church, find our voice. Empower us to change this broken world and to protest the needless deaths caused by gun violence. Give us power to rise above our fear that nothing can be done and grant us the conviction to advocate for change.For your dream of love and harmony, Loving God,Make us instruments of your peace.All this we pray in the name of the One who offered his life so that we might live, Jesus the Christ.  Amen. John Myers says: June 21, 2016 at 4:22 pm We must do something about America’s insane obsession about guns. They are the easiest and quickest tool for murder so limiting their use would be a good first step. Also, we should encourage the sale of “smart” guns; where only the owner can fire the gun. June 14, 2016 at 6:50 pm Thanks for your response. It seems that the litany would be stronger, and less polarizing, if it addressed all violence and didn’t focus on a tool. By focusing on guns and not on the causes of violence, this litany runs the risk of devaluing the victims of violence and of demonizing those of us who own and use guns lawfully and responsibly. (Yes, I’m a gun owner.) I’d like the Bishops United Against Gun Violence to hear from more Episcopalians who own guns and are committed to working to reduce violence. Youth Minister Lorton, VA June 16, 2016 at 11:04 am But he didn’t use fertilizer. If it were just as easy, as you say, he’d probably have done so (seems it would have been more effective for his goals). Instead, he used guns. Legally obtained guns. Michael Staley says: June 14, 2016 at 7:12 pm No, it’s not the only violence we care about; but it certainly is on our minds the week following one of the deadliest gun massacres of our day. Charles Browning says: June 14, 2016 at 7:15 pm Literally our country leads the developed world for gun violence, even adjusting for population. It’s a reasonable thing to pray about. I’m a gun owner and I have both victims of gun violence and victims of other violence in my life, and I think this litany sounds helpful, powerful, and appropriate. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ June 14, 2016 at 5:23 pm The phrasing of “Barack, our president” is entirely consistent with other forms of the Prayers of the People and appropriate here, for that reason. We pray for “N., our president” regardless of whether it is the president of our choosing, implying nothing more in terms of either affection of political endorsement. Press Release Service June 18, 2016 at 10:59 am I know at least one of the bishops, a former police officer, owns a gun. He’s spoken about that openly. I understand it’s hard not to feel defensive but this really isn’t about picking on responsible gun owners. And “gun violence”, as opposed to guns, does cover the other facets of this. Rick Taylor says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Jonathan Chesney says: June 14, 2016 at 7:50 pm Wendy I agree with you . The person responsible for the tragedy in Orlando could just have easily used fertilizer to blow the place up. I think I am one of the few people on my side of the fence who believes the problem is not so much about the weapon used as about the pathology of the person that causes mayhem, fear, and damage and death. June 15, 2016 at 8:00 pm Fertilizer and diesel fuel were the ingredients of the bomb that killed 168 in Oklahoma City. Perhaps another example would better serve. Continued Blessings. June 14, 2016 at 8:58 pm I don’t suspect that form of having any political intention. The 1559 Prayer Book uses the form “Elizabeth, our most gracious Queen and governor” in the Litany, and “Elizabeth our queen” in the prayers in the Holy Communion liturgy. The “first name, official position” formula is traditional and common, and that’s probably why it has been used. My church prayed for “George, our president,” and then the Sunday after the inauguration switched to “Barack, our president,” and next January we will pray for “N., our president,” even if some of us don’t like “N.” I find it helpful in reminding me, when it’s an official I wish weren’t in that position, that they are a child of God, in a position of great authority and influence, and that I should pray for them even if I disagree with them. Martha Richards says: June 17, 2016 at 6:39 pm I believe that no one should ever refer to a firearm as a “toy.” I know it was said in a sarcastic manner, but this site has nothing to do with sarcasm. It is about prayer regarding a serious subject. As a responsible firearms owner, I would never refer to my guns as toys. When used responsibly for sport, they are just like a baseball bat . When used irresponsibly, to hurt someone, they are deadly weapons, but so are automobiles, fertilizer, gasoline, and knives. What we need to pray for is for people to stop hating. Hate is what fuels the use of any of these items to be used as objects that contribute to death. Pray for the world to stop hating. Stop hating people you don’t know just because they are different. If someone is a decent human being but dresses differently, it doesn’t make them a person to be feared. It is only those who threaten us that we should fear. We need to pray that those who mean to do us harm are stopped so that the world can take a breath and get back to the work that God wants us to do. Prayer is a powerful thing. Please pray for the world. Comments (36) Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Todd Bruce says: Heidi Shott says: June 14, 2016 at 6:04 pm I don’t understand the responses to this request ~ why does it appear that everything has to be a struggle. Is it not possible for a people bound together in the Baptismal Covenant to seek peace with one another and bring an end to all forms of violence, strife, and discord, and be of one mind in Christ for the sake of the human community? June 15, 2016 at 12:56 pm Oh dear LORD, it’s a prayer! Pray it, don’t pray it, who cares. But don’t spit in everybody else’s communion cup who try to do something helpful and positive. We didn’t just have 50 people murdered this week by fertilizer. We didn’t have families ripped to shreds by responsible gun owners. Please be mindful of the hurt we cause others by defending our toys, when it was one of our toys that ruined so many lives. Remember: you can’t evangelize and antagonize at the same time. Wendy Owens says: Deacon Katharine Armentrout says: Mary Ann Hill says: Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska Dorothy M. Harrelson says: June 14, 2016 at 5:42 pm Mr. Mason, You are entitled to your opinion about what is appropriate to include in a religious liturgy, and perhaps you are unfamiliar with the Prayers of the People section of the Book of Common Prayer. This can be found on pages 383 – 395. The rubrics, or directions for which intercessions are to be included are as follows: The Universal Church, its members, and its mission; The Nation and all in authority; The welfare of the world; The concerns of the local community; Those who suffer and those in any trouble; The departed (with commemoration of a saint when appropriate). To the best of my recollection, President Barack Obama (or any other president of the USA) is one of those persons “in authority” in the Nation, therefore we often do pray by name for him as well as for the governor of the state in which the prayers are being said.It has nothing to do with “a tone of affection and political endorsement” as you have suggested. Even if you dislike our president (as you seem to imply by stating this concern), consider this: Jesus has commanded us to pray for our enemies. Perhaps you could bring yourself to do so? The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group June 14, 2016 at 5:57 pm We have prayed for our president for a long time, no matter his political party. See Form I (BCP 384), and other places (BCP 390, 820, 821). So no, it is not affection or political endorsement. And, we are instructed to pray not only for those who champion our causes and channel our voices, but especially those with whom we disagree, even our enemies. Including prayers for our president and leaders of government couldn’t be more appropriate for this liturgy and all of our liturgies. June 14, 2016 at 6:35 pm Yes, I agree about the the tone of what can be interpreted as a political endorsement for the president. Suffice to say “…you have given us leaders, our president, the members of congress…” Jay Lassiter says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA June 14, 2016 at 6:48 pm This has been used for years for many presidents. It is entirely appropriate and extremely important at this time. Lorraine Rosen says: William Flint says: William Flint says: Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Orlando Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags June 14, 2016 at 5:11 pm Is this response really necessary at this time, 2 days after the murder of 49 people in a gay night club? It seems urgent to me right now to ask God’s help in addressing the scourge of gun violence in our nation and to grieve the loss of these men and women whose lives were taken by a man who was by any measure severely conflicted and prone to physical and verbal violence. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK June 15, 2016 at 12:11 am Thank you for this valuable liturgical resource.center_img Litany for Gun Violence Prevention offered for use in Sunday services Liturgy & Music, Rector Smithfield, NC June 15, 2016 at 2:09 pm Gun violence is undeniably terrible. Unfortunately, there are more victims of domestic violence in less than one week than gun violence in one year, but domestic violence victims only become a headline if a gun is involved. Worse still are the FBI Uniform Crime Report statistics related to blunt and edged weapon violence victims. May we stop focusing on one branch of the tree and address the disease that is attacking the forrest: violence. June 16, 2016 at 3:57 pm My heart is bleeding. I turned to this website to find ideas about acting in concert as Episcopalians to address some of the violence issues facing us as a country in the wake of Orlando. And what here? Bickering, angry, back and forth quarrels about a prayer, a prayer! This is just like a discussion on MSNBC or Fox News; not like a discussion I hoped to find in my church. Somehow this message-board speaks volumes about how wretchedly divided we are as a nation and, now sadly, even as the church. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT T.G. Collins says: Submit an Event Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Christine Moseley says: June 18, 2016 at 11:03 am As a priest in the Diocese of Oklahoma, I have to say no, it wouldn’t, and please don’t use the Murrah Building bombing as a red herring. Russ Hoyser says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books June 14, 2016 at 1:16 pm I’d say this week we need to focus on gun violence- not that it is all we care about but 93 people dead over the weekend from guns seems like a reason to focus. Domestic violence, sexual violence,violence against the children of God for any reason should be part of our prayers always. Good to be reminded. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Peter Champion says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Sara Sather says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Gun Violence, Rector Shreveport, LA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI June 15, 2016 at 8:46 am Maybe the time has come in such a political environment that is as divisive as this one to rethink this practice and find a more generic way of saying the same thing. The United Methodists when using a common prayer and not a pastoral prayer usually pray for the leaders of the nations of the world inclusive of all elected officials in the federal, state, county and local governments. TEC has split more than once over issues with the BCP. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL June 14, 2016 at 6:01 pm It is totally “appropriate”…in the Episcopal church we pray for the leaders of our nation in our Prayers of the People all the time…it has nothing to do w/politics…it is praying “for the nation and all in authority” and Barack is our leader at present time. June 26, 2016 at 2:08 am June 21st I survived a shooting. My neighbor, and friend, had a psychotic break and turned a shotgun and semi automatic 22 on us. Dozens of bullets are embedded in our brick walls outside, with ten penetrating and being embedded in our interior walls. Four shotgun blasts, the first of which missed my moms head by a second, came through out windows. We were under siege for fifty minutes. SWAT was called, THREE volleys of shots peppered my home during this time and it is a miracle that my family is even still standing. So you don’t like the words “gun violence”? Well, let me tell you this- a man who was once our friend terrorized us in a way that would have been absolutely impossible to do with a knife. We can scream and cry about how polarizing the term Gun Violence is our you can focus on what really is important…..the victims. Gun violence exists, that is undeniable. It is an epidemic in our country, also undeniable. It seems that the topic gets brought up and many jump to this idea that if we acknowledge gun violence we are somehow taking something away from responsible gun owners. Let me clear: This prayer is not about responsible gun owners. It is not about gun owners at all. It is about acknowledgement that people are harmed and terrorized every day with a weapon that can kill you in a second. Don’t politicize this and take the comfort we can offer through prayer away from those who really need the reassurance. I think you’ll be surprised to know how many people in your own community have fallen victim to gun violence. Ace Wyatt says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Pittsburgh, PA Lorraine Rosen says: Posted Jun 14, 2016 The Rev Jeff Martinhauk says: Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ June 16, 2016 at 4:06 pm I’m reading about what we should be praying for. At the moment the people of Orlando who were killed or injured an d their families are the focus. We always need to pray for people who are hurting. Now, as Episcopalians/Anglicans, we need to join together to hold everyone who is hurting up in prayer. And we need to stop arguing about what is more important to pray about. JOIN TOGETHER AND PRAY FOR PEACE. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY June 14, 2016 at 12:15 pm So “gun violence” is the only kind of violence we care about? June 14, 2016 at 3:39 pm This litany was originally written for the Gun Violence Prevention Sabbath last December. Bishop Lane wrote it because we couldn’t find one to share with the churches in the Diocese of Maine. It seemed right to share it widely this week. Sadly, there are other litanies that need to be written to offer up prayers and calls to action for other types of violence. Here’s one of his columns about domestic violence and guns on the Bishops United Against Gun Violence site:http://bishopsagainstgunviolence.org/guns-and-domestic-violence-cant-be-separated/Hope this helps.Heidi ShottCanon for Communication and AdvocacyEpiscopal Diocese of Maine June 15, 2016 at 9:30 am The litany does not say one word about gun restrictions or gun control. Surely it is appropriate to pray for victims of gun violence. Saying we have to address all forms of violence at this time is like saying it is inappropriate to address breast cancer because there are other forms of cancer that kill and maim people. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Marc Mason says: June 18, 2016 at 3:54 pm Evil is the result of fear. Fear is the opposite of Love. God is Love. Guns are not for protection. Guns are for killing living creatures, God’s creatures. In the Bible we are commanded to “Fear not; Be not afraid; Have no fear.” —-Three hundred sixty-six times we are given that commandment! If we love our enemies and believe that love overpowers fear and defeats fear, there is no need for guns. If we follow Jesus, we believe Jesus word’s, and we do unto others as we would have them do unto us. If we believe in eternal life, we have no fear of death. By the way, I love you. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY June 14, 2016 at 3:00 pm What about a Liturgy for the babies killed in abortions? If the TEC doesn’t get a handle of progressive issues, I fear many members will be looking for more moderate or conservative churches. Wendy Owens says: June 14, 2016 at 4:55 pm Marc, Part of “The Prayers of the People” every Sunday, includes a paragraph of prayer for ourleaders. President, Governors, Mayors. What is wrong with a tone of affection? This is a Year of Mercy, after all. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA June 14, 2016 at 5:57 pm What a thoughtful and powerful litany to comfort those in sorrow at such a difficult time. Let us not bicker among each other about what topic is most important. Just for today let us unite in compassion and support for those who have lost and suffered so much. Wm. Thomas Martin says: Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments are closed. Zoe Holland says: Rector Belleville, IL Mary Ann Hill says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Jonathan Chesney says: last_img read more

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