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Face-Off: Does Rugby Need An Orange Card?

first_img Face-Off: Does Rugby Need An Orange Card?PAUL WILLIAMSRugby World online columnistThe game can’t cope with another rule change. Other than Donald Trump’s weave, there are few things more complex. Yet an orange card is required to maintain rugby’s appeal.Historically, yellow cards were dished out for misdemeanours and red cards reserved for incidents that fell outside the laws. Stamping, eye-gouging and neck-high tackles have never been part of rugby and justified a red card. However, rugby is now delivering red cards where the outcome is entwined with an opponent’s body angle or positioning. Professional rugby is a game of small margins and a red card makes victory impossible for the affected team.The inevitable mismatch caused also creates commercial pressures. If a red card occurs in the opening minutes, consumers literally switch off – with implications for advertising revenue.An orange card is the solution. Orange cards should place a player in the sin-bin for 20 minutes. Enough time to damage the offending team’s chances of winning – but not enough to render the result a formality. ALAN PEAREYRugby World writer Orange area?Benjamin Fall’s red card for this was later rescinded (Getty Images) Paul Williams and Alan Pearey discuss whether rugby needs an orange card in the game. Want to weigh in on this debate? Follow Rugby World on Facebook and Twitter to let us know where you stand.This article originally appeared in Rugby World’s September edition. It’s easy to sympathise with a player sent off for a technical misjudgement, such as Elliot Daly for taking out Argentina’s Leonardo Senatore in the air in 2016. But that doesn’t lessen the pain for the victim of that mistake as he clatters to the ground.The zero-tolerance approach to dangerous tackles or aerial challenges was a measured response to injury research. In striving for a safer game, World Rugby realise that only severe sanctions will do. Otherwise, why would a player pay attention to it? It’s like giving a drunk driver a ticking-off and a £50 fine – it’s not enough to make them change their behaviour.An orange card would fudge the issue in incidents of foul play, giving referees a soft option when they need to be firm. It would increase confusion in a game craving more simplicity. It would send the wrong message.And red cards shouldn’t be viewed as an automatic match-killer. England won that game in which they lost Daly, and earlier this year Racing, Leinster and Edinburgh are just three other teams to have won big games following an early dismissal. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Learning to take it slow

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Featured Events Linda Ryan says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments are closed. Janice M. Schuyler says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Smithfield, NC Learning to take it slow Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET October 17, 2012 at 5:35 pm It’s good if you can take all the time you need to heal. Many don’t have the luxury of that kind of time. For some of us, we have to get back to work or the bills don’t get paid becuase we don’t have jobs that give us benefits. At least some of us have jobs, which others don’t. THey have the time to heal but not the luxury of a period of recuperation where stress is minimal and healing is maximal.May your recovery be blip-less and steady.Kitty, 3-1/2 weeks post-surgery and back at work for the past 2-1/2 weeks. New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Martinsville, VA October 18, 2012 at 9:50 am I am a retired priest no living in Central Massachusetts. Knowing yourself is key to this, knowing I tend to be driven, prior to my first surgery (and prior to ordination), I said to myself,during recovery time I need to ask myself: “Do I feel I am taking it too easy, too slowly.” If the answer is yes, then probably I am doing it just right. The day after ordination as a transitional deacon I had major surgery and a week later insisted on being deacon for Christmas Eve. I did it, but later realized how foolish I was. And, I realized I needed to get back in touch with some reality about myself that I did not want to lose as an ordained person. Sometimes learning from our mistaken perceptions is the only way some of us can learn. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Submit a Job Listing Alecia Moroz says: Submit an Event Listing [Religion News Service] When I alerted my readers that I would be taking time off from writing to recover from surgery, many sent me kind words with a common theme: “Take time to heal.”“Give your body time to heal,” said one. “Rest and sleep,” said another. “Be sure to take ALL the time you need for a full recovery!” and “Don’t try to power through. Stop, lie down and rest. … We will still be here.”I was hearing the wisdom of experience: been there, didn’t take the time, thought I was healed, wasn’t.That certainly has been my experience from previous times of loss and stress. I haven’t always taken enough time to heal. I moved on too soon, when my head, in effect, was still woozy.Even now, a week after surgery, I find my mind drifting off. I will be thinking through a sentence and find I have jumped tracks. I will need to read the same page of a novel several times and replay a scene in a recorded TV show.So this time I am taking time. No rushing back to work, no making important decisions, no feeling impatient to have my wits fully about me.I am revisiting earlier healing scenarios. After 9/11, for example, many wanted to seize control of the situation and begin making critical decisions. Partly, that was the inevitable fog of war; action needed to be taken. But some of our response was an unfortunate rush to reassert control, and a rush to escape the pain of loss and feeling helpless. The decisions that came out of that rush were poor.I remember a time when I had been pummeled in a job. Once out the door, I wanted to take control, get my life in order, be free of pain. I rushed it. Even though I tried to learn from the experience, I wanted the interim to end ASAP. Impatience led me to see things without sufficient clarity and to make decisions that weren’t wise. Looking back on it, my rush to escape the agony merely extended the agony.One way to assert control was to manage the flow of information. It’s better, I now realize, to be radically transparent.A second way was to play all roles myself. I would be patient, chronicler, therapist, and source of strength. I allowed my daily writings to go from the revelations of autobiographical discovery to self-obsession and self-justification. My writings became dull.This time, I am setting no internal stopwatch, imposing no expectations, not seeing this recovery time as an unfortunate pause before real life resumes. With the help of my extraordinary wife, I am allowing myself to move slowly, to focus on pain management, to take my medications as instructed, to let my body tell me when it’s time to extend my afternoon walk.Most difficult for me, and yet most critical, when I try to write and sense my mind clouding over, I close my laptop and turn to reading. For me, not writing is a bit like not breathing, but I know it’s part of getting healthy.I have made two discoveries: Giving up control is far more healing than trying to assert control.And people are amazingly kind. If given the opening to express concern and affection, they do so. I’m not sure what I expected. This surgery is a first for me. But I treasure what has come thus far: a calming and affirming tenderness.– Tom Ehrich is a writer, church consultant and Episcopal priest based in New York. He is the author of “Just Wondering, Jesus” and founder of the Church Wellness Project. His website is www.morningwalkmedia.com. Follow Tom on Twitter @tomehrich.Statements and opinions expressed in the articles and communications herein, are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Episcopal News Service or the Episcopal Church. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Jack H Haney says: October 17, 2012 at 6:25 pm Precisely the advice I have given. On 9/11 I had a spinal Laminectomy and Fusion, and on 9/13 a cardiac arrest and pneumonia developing out of it. After a WIERD week in CCU and further hospitalization, and over two weeks in a nursing home/rehab center, home is wonderful, but so are the necessary period of rest, going to bed early, and watching my diet and doing necessary PT and Occupational therapies. What used to be done quickly and unthinkingly is now dome slowly with intentionality of thought. There is also time for thought, contemplation and prayer. Reading is slower. And I am discovering what was once important is now less so. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Tampa, FL Rector Collierville, TN October 22, 2012 at 12:01 pm Okay, God, I got the message. Thank you for sending me so many wonderful messengers, including Tom, to get through my thick skull! I knew it was bad when I admitted to my spiritual director that I was looking forward to the time after my upcoming surgery, because I hoped to recapture that thin space I knew earlier this year when I was recovering from a nearly fatal acute and necrotizing pancreatitis attack. During that time, I had no choice but to be still and present in the moment. I was too sick to do otherwise. No one expected anything from me but to heal. More importantly, I didn’t expect anything else from me. Now, 7 months out from that attack, I am back to full swing, even though my body and my heart are telling me I’m not quite ready.When I woke up from my coma, I could feel God’s presence. At that moment, I knew, really knew for the first time in my life, that I didn’t need to do or be anything. I knew at the core of my being that I was a child of God and that was enough. That feeling stayed with me for a long, long time, but now I feel it being crowded out by the noise of daily life and the expectations that come with it.Thank you, God, for giving me a chance to recapture that thin space. Help me find the right balance of contemplation and activity to fulfill your will for my life. Help us all to remember your guiding wisdom as found in Isaiah 30:15 “In returning and rest, you shall be saved; in quietness and in trust shall be your strength.” (English Standard Version) Comments (4) Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By Tom EhrichPosted Oct 17, 2012 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab last_img read more

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When resolutions go bad: The difference between a sprain and a…

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your comment! TAGSFlorida Hospital – Apopkasprainstrain Previous articleApopka Weekly Arrest ReportNext articleCelebrate 100 years of majesty with a visit to a national park Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 What to Do and Not DoFrom Florida Hospital – Apopka Unrecognizable injured runner sitting on a wooden floor background You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here The Anatomy of Fear LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your name here For starters, let’s clarify the difference between a strain and a sprain. A sprain occurs when a ligament (connective tissues, like elastic bands that connect the end of one bone to another and also keep your joints in place) is stretched or torn. It’s common to feel a pop or tear when this happens. A strain is a stretched or torn muscle or tendon (tissue connecting muscle to the bone).The good news is: You can sometimes treat the pain of strainYs and sprains at home. However, we checked in with Holly Myers, physical therapist at Florida Hospital, to determine when you need to seek out a medical professional, and what you can do to strengthen your muscles in your feet, ankles and any other affected areas. Here’s what she had to say:What areas are the most at-risk for sprains and strains?The areas of your body most vulnerable to sprains are your ankles, knees and wrists. As strains go, those areas are your shoulders, legs (think hamstrings) and back.What’s the most common cause of sprains and strains? Sprains and strains can happen in a variety of circumstances. Everything from overuse injuries (working out/playing sports too long without proper rest) to twisting/pulling something to sustaining an unfortunate fall can lead to a sprain or strain. There’s not one most common thing.How do they occur?A sprained ankle can occur when your foot turns inward, placing extreme tension on the ligaments of your outer ankle. A sprained knee may be the result of a sudden twist, and a sprained wrist can occur when you fall on an outstretched hand.A strain can occur similar to a sprain, where it may be a simple stretch in your muscle or tendon; or it may be a partial or complete tear in your muscle/tendon connection.What are the signs of a sprain?Signs and symptoms of sprains include:• Pain• Swelling• Bruising• Instability of the joint• Decreased range of motionWhat are the signs of a strain?• Pain• Inflammation• Muscle spasm• Muscle cramping• Muscle weakness• Bruising (either immediately or a few days later)Can you care for a sprain or strain at home, or should a medical professional look at the injury? There are things that you can do in the first 24 to 48 hours to help alleviate pain and begin the healing process. You should rest, protect the injured area, use crutches or other assistive devices as needed to help immobilize, compress (not too tight), elevate, and apply ice 15 to 20 minutes or at least every 2 hours.If you don’t see any improvement in a couple of days, you should see a medical professional to evaluate the extent of your injury.Physical therapy can help improve pain, motion, strength and recovery time. Also, it helps get you back to your normal activities quickly and safely, and you’ll learn what to do, and what not to do, so you don’t reinjure yourself.How are sprains and strains diagnosed?Most sprains and strains are diagnosed by a physical exam. Your medical professional will exam the affected joint or muscles and take them through their normal range of motion, watching for pain, tenderness, weakness or instability.If there’s a chance you’ve broken a bone, an X-ray may be ordered.  Magnetic resonance imaging may be needed to determine the extent of your injury because soft tissue, where sprains and strains occur, don’t show up on X-rays.How long does a sprain or strain usually take to heal?It varies based on the severity of your injury and how much you’re still using the area after the injury. Recovery ranges from a couple of days to a few weeks.Why can’t I just walk or shake it off?In 2013, the National Athletic Trainers Association issued a position statement that ankle injuries should never be taken lightly and are too often mistreated or not treated at all. The ensuing result is an ankle prone to problems – prolonged discomfort and possible re-injury, which can lead to reduced physical activity levels.And with an injury that never gets better, whether it’s your ankle or another area, chances are you may settle for a sedentary lifestyle, which can lead to further long-term health complications.Preventing sprains and strainsRegular stretching and strengthening exercises can help minimize your risks of sprains and strains and improve motion in all areas of the body.You can use a variety of stretching techniques to make sure you have full range of motion at all joints and lessen your chances of injuries too. And, using a foam roller can help with stretching and mobility.Progressive strengthening exercises allow you to better stabilize yourself during activity. Balancing exercises train your body to know where it is in space and reduce your injury rate. 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Legacy Promotion Ireland launches radio campaign

first_img Tagged with: Ireland legacies The legacy consortium formed to promote charity legacy giving in Ireland has launched a radio campaign to promote leaving a charitable legacy, according to a report in the Irish Times.The campaign, which cost €42,000, focussed on the over 50s age group, with the ads featuring prominently on Marian Finucane’s RTE Radio 1 programme on Saturdays and Sundays. The Legacy Promotion Ireland (LPI) campaign asked people to remember their favourite charity in their will, “after your family has been looked after”.Marketed under mylegacy.ie, the site does not collect money directly and is an information site with links to its 40 charity members who hope to benefit from the campaign in the next seven to 10 years. Advertisement Legacy Promotion Ireland launches radio campaign  24 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.center_img A member of mylegacy.ie, the Irish Cancer Society (ICS), said it had not received any negative feedback on the campaign and the society’s Jane Curtin described the radio campaign as “very intensive” and “very pervasive”. The campaign was paid for by the fees given to LPI by its members, each of which pays according to its means. The ICS pays €5,000 annually, while the smaller of the 40 charities pay as little as €400.Comments from John Gill, a partner in the private client department of law firm Matheson Ormsby Prentice, indicate that the campaign may be timely. Mr Gill said he had not seen a trend towards people leaving charitable legacies in Ireland.www.mylegacy.ie AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 9 December 2009 | Newslast_img read more

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Big Society won’t be ‘big’ in all areas of Yorkshire

first_imgBig Society won’t be ‘big’ in all areas of Yorkshire Advertisement Tagged with: Giving/Philanthropy North East Research / statistics Howard Lake | 16 February 2011 | News  23 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis The potential impact of the local authority cuts to the voluntary sector in Yorkshire has been revealed in the latest third sector trend surveys.Along with the threat to 26,000 voluntary sector jobs, the research has revealed how important public sector investment is to the health of charities and voluntary organisations. 51% of the income of general charities in the region comes from ‘statutory services’ which is considerably higher than the national figure of 42%. Alongside this, the proportion of income from individuals including donations and legacies is 26.3% compared with 36.9% nationally.The findings, which come from three pieces of research carried out by Involve Yorkshire & Humber, Sheffield Hallam University, the Northern Rock Foundation and Southampton University, also revealed that the spending cuts are having a disproportionate affect on different areas of the region.The cuts are biting the deepest in the areas where the numbers of voluntary organisations and volunteers are relatively lower than in, usually, more affluent areas, namely Doncaster, Hull, Bradford and North Lincolnshire. However, the significance of public funding to the voluntary sector varies considerably across the region from 51% of civil society organisations in Hull to 32% in North Yorkshire.Worryingly, nearly 60% of charities in Yorkshire and the Humber have less than one year’s expenditure held as assets and the data revealed that larger organisations employing more staff are less likely to hold significant reserves, posing a threat to more jobs.The research developed in partnership with the Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research (CRESR) at Sheffield Hallam University and funded by the Economic and Social Research Council, examines the key drivers of the Big Society in the region and indentifies the challenges to overcome for the initiative to work.Involve Yorkshire & Humber is emphasising the need for voluntary sector and local authorities to work more closely together to minimise the impact of cuts on local people and services.Mark Crowe from Involve Yorkshire & Humber, says: “The different areas of Yorkshire and the Humber provide an incredible contrast in terms of the level, density, scope and vibrancy of civil society activities. Therefore agendas to promote a Big Society must be played out very differently in different areas.”“The fundamental point is that the Big Society is unlikely to be ‘Big’ in all areas of our region. The initiative is about bringing power to the local communities, but how are voluntary sector organisations in places like Doncaster and Bradford going to be able to deliver public services if they’ve got no money?”Mark continues: “Liverpool has already pulled out as a key partner in Cameron’s Big Society initiative due to the Government-imposed spending cuts and if this unrealistic approach continues, I fear more will follow.”The research is a significant contribution to the region’s voluntary sector knowledge bank and will be used proactively to influence Government and a local and national level.Professor Peter Wells, director of CRESR, said: “This research demonstrates what is happening out there in the real world and how it translates into the Government’s Big Society agenda. The research identifies a number of key challenges to the implementation of a Big Society and until these are addressed, the initiative will struggle to find its feet in our region.”Mark concludes: “The stark reality is that the Big Society initiative cannot be successful if organisations and individuals aren’t given the support to engage in it. Can our region support the Big Society and its aim to help communities do more for themselves when the Government is cutting the lifeline to hundreds of these vital and worthwhile groups?”The research can be accessed at www.involveyorkshirehumber.org.uk/resources/reports/EndsAll media enquiries to Lizzie Hughes or Nick Moules at Cicada Communications on 01423 567111 or [email protected] to editors:A Big Society In The North? was written by Peter Wells, Jan Gilbertson and Tony Gore from the Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research at Sheffield Hallam University and Mark Crowe from Involve Yorkshire & Humber. It is available to read at www.shu.ac.uk/cresr. A Big Society in Yorkshire and Humber? was funded by the Economic and Social Research Council.Involve Yorkshire & Humber (formerly Yorkshire & the Humber Forum) is an independent social business and charity, which leads a vibrant voluntary sector in the region. Involve has over 130 members linking them to more than 20,000 front line groups. Involve Yorkshire & Humber was set up in 1997 to act as a strategic voice for voluntary and community networks in the region. It brings together voluntary and community sector organisations to ensure that the sector has the right support and structures to contribute to regional activity.Involve Yorkshire & Humber’s membership is made up of voluntary and community organisations including locally based groups, social enterprises and large charities and independent consultants.The voluntary and community sector contributes £2.75bn per year to the Yorkshire economy, employs 72,700 people and involves 66,000 trustees. Its 300,000 volunteers give 25 million hours per year.Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research (CRESR), Sheffield Hallam UniversityThe Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research (CRESR) at Sheffield Hallam University is a leading social policy research centre in the United Kingdom.Go to www.shu.ac.uk/cresr for more details.Click here to read our latest newsletter www.cicada-comms.com/newsPRide Award Winners Outstanding Public Relations Consultancy 2009 and Best Not for Profit Campaign 2009Cicada Communications Limited registered in England, Registration No. 4383108Registered address: Cicada Communications Ltd, 101 Station Parade, Harrogate, North Yorkshire HG1 1HBVAT Number: GB 789 6545 53 About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. 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François Hollande urged to seek release of journalists while in Baku

first_img “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says News AzerbaijanEurope – Central Asia June 8, 2021 Find out more After visiting Yerevan today for the 100th anniversary of the Armenian genocide, President François Hollande will meet with his Azerbaijani counterpart in Baku tomorrow. Reporters Without Borders urges him to use the opportunity to clearly request the release of imprisoned journalists and an end to harassment of the government’s critics.Azerbaijan is ranked 162nd out of 180 countries in the 2015 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index after registering one of the biggest performance declines of any country. Virtually all of its independent journalists and outspoken bloggers have been silenced, thrown into prison or driven into exile.“After eliminating all media pluralism, the Azerbaijani authorities are systematically suppressing the few remaining sources of criticism,” Reporters Without Borders programme director Lucie Morillon said.“In the run-up to the first European Olympic Games, the continent’s leaders have a special duty to condemn the unprecedented crackdown being orchestrated by Baku. We call on François Hollande to make the release of imprisoned journalists a condition for the presence of a French delegation at the opening ceremony of these games.”Two journalists were released in December but eight other journalists and four online activists are still being held on trumped-up charges because of their reporting. They include Khadija Ismayilova, the country’s most famous investigative journalist, who has been held since December 2014.In all, Azerbaijan has around 100 political prisoners, including human rights defenders Rasul Jafarov and Intigam Aliyev, who were given jail sentences of six and a half years and seven and a half years respectively last week.One by one, the last independent media outlets are being silenced as a result of various forms of pressure by President Ilham Aliyev’s regime.The Baku bureau of Radio Azadliq – Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty’s Azerbaijani service – was forcibly closed last December. The independent newspaper Zerkalo stopped publishing in May 2014 after being throttled economically. The last opposition daily, Azadlig, is collapsing under the impact of astronomical damages awards and political persecution. The government controls the entire broadcast sector.The main NGOs that support the media and defend freedom of information have also had to shut down. Emin Huseynov, the head of the Institute for Reporters’ Freedom and Safety, has been holed up in the Swiss embassy since August. He sought refuge there after his home and his NGO were raided.The climate of intimidation is reinforced by physical attacks that usually go unpunished, blackmail attempts and inflammatory verbal attacks on government critics, who are decried as “traitors” or “foreign agents.”(Photo: AFP / Stéphane de Sakutin) News Russian peacekeepers deny foreign reporters access to Nagorno-Karabakh News Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts Reporters Without Borders calls on France to condition its presence at the opening of the first European Olympic Games, to be held in Baku in June, on the release of all journalists detained in Azerbaijan. April 24, 2015 – Updated on January 20, 2016 François Hollande urged to seek release of journalists while in Baku RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan AzerbaijanEurope – Central Asia Organisation RSF_en News Follow the news on Azerbaijan to go further June 4, 2021 Find out more April 9, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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PARC says not enough publicity of new learner driver penalty points

first_imgNews Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Google+ Twitter Google+ 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal WhatsApp Previous articleCouncillors meet to discuss purchase of Rockhill and Lifford barracksNext articleGallagher wins bronze in Russia News Highland Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHORcenter_img PARC says not enough publicity of new learner driver penalty points WhatsApp Donegal based road safety group PARC says there is not enough publicity of  new penalty points for learner drivers.The new Road Traffic Act will allow, for the first time, learner drivers to receive penalty points for driving unaccompanied or for not displaying learner plates.Susan Grey of PARC says that due to the lack of publicity, learner drivers may be unaware the new laws even exist:[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/susaPARC.mp3[/podcast] Facebook By News Highland – February 23, 2014 Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Facebook Twitter Pinterest Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firelast_img read more

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Bogdan Michalkiawicz murder reconstruction to feature on Crimecall

first_img Twitter WhatsApp By News Highland – June 14, 2013 Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Twitter Google+ Facebook Google+ Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Bogdan Michalkiawicz murder reconstruction to feature on Crimecallcenter_img WhatsApp Previous articleDepartment of the Environment apologises to former Donegal County Council plannerNext articleAttorney General to advise on how Donegal planning corruption claims can be investigated News Highland Gardaí investigating the murder of a Polish male in his 40s in Letterkenny are seeking assistance from the public. The body of Bogdan Michalkiawicz was discovered at 15 Westside Apartments, Letterkenny on the morning of Wednesday 15th May 2013.The deceased was last seen alive on Monday the 13th May 2013Investigating Gardaí are seeking information from the public regarding any unusual or suspicious activity that they may have observed in the Westside Apartments, Lower Main Street, Pearse Road area of Letterkenny between Friday 10th May 2013 and the evening of Tuesday 14th May 2013.On Tuesday 18th June 2013 a reconstruction of the event will be aired on RTE’S Crimecall programme at 9.35pm. An appeal for information will be made by An Garda Síochána.Anyone with information is asked to contact the incident room at Letterkenny Garda Sttaion on 074-9167170, the Garda Confidential Line 1-800-666-111 or any Garda Station.In Polish..Gardaí/Policja w Letterkenny prowadzi sledztwo w sprawie zabojstwa 41 letniego mezczyzny polskiego pochodzenia. Gardaí/Policja prosi o pomoc polskich obywateli w tej sprawie.Cialo Bogdana Michalkiewicza znaleziono w srode 15-go Maja 2013 w apartamencie numer 15 Westside Apartments, Letterkenny. Poszkodowany byl widziany ostatnio w godzinach popoludniowych w Poniedzialek 13-go Maja 2013.Gardaí/Policja w Letterkenny szuka informacji na temat jakichkolwiek podejrzanych lub niecodziennych zdarzen zaobserwowanych w okolicach Westside Apartemnts; Lower Main Street, Pearse Road w Letterkenny pomiedzy piatkiem 10-go Maja 2013 a wtorkiem 14-go Maja 2013.We wtorek 18 Czerwca 2013 bedzie wyswietlona rekonstrukcja zdarzen z morderstwa Bogdana Michalkiewicza na kanale telewizji RTE, podczas comiesiecznego programu kryminalistycznego “Crimecall” o godzinie 21.35.Aby skontaktowac sie z “Crimecall” w noc nadawania programu prosze dzwonic z jakimikolwiek informacjami w tej sprawie na numer 1890 40 50 60. Oddzial Dochodzeniowy w Letterkenny czeka na informacje pod numerem tel. 074 9167170. Dodatkowo informacje na temat sledztwa mozna przekazywac pod numerem tel. 1800 666 111. Informacje przekazywane pod tymi numerami sa traktowane calkowicie poufnie. Istnieje mozliwosc rozmowy w jezyku angielskim jak i polskim. Pinterest Facebook 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Pinterest News Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firelast_img read more

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2,285 Donegal students receiving Leaving Certificate results today

first_img Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Pinterest Facebook Twitter DL Debate – 24/05/21 News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th WhatsApp 2,285 Donegal students receiving Leaving Certificate results today By News Highland – August 16, 2017 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebookcenter_img Pinterest Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Homepage BannerNews Previous articleBenedict Cumberbatch could be playing Nigel Farage in TV miniseries on BrexitNext articleAnother man arrested in Derry following Lisfannon Park shooting News Highland WhatsApp Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Google+ Twitter Google+ Over 58,000 pupils are getting their Leaving Cert results across the country this morning,2,285 of them in Donegal.A new grading system’s been applied to all subjects this year – reducing to eight the number of grades available at each level.More students took higher level papers across almost all subjects this year, and fewer students are failing subjects.For the first time in 25 years, the points system is getting a major shakeup, in a bid to take some of the heat out of the points race for college.Instead of A1s and 2s and B1s 2s and 3s, there will be 8 grades each at Higher and Ordinary level.Perhaps the biggest change, which is borne out in today’s results, is that pupils who score between 30 and 40 percent will get points at Higher Level, this was previously not the case.Students are urged not to panic about the changes, and are advised that until CAO offers are made next Monday, the changes in points for courses will not be comparable to last year.Students who are concerned about their results can avail of hotline set up by the National Parents Council, for queries on everything from points to repeats.A help line is manned by trained guidance counsellors and is open for the next six days.Helpline Number is Free Phone 1800 265 165last_img read more

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Valuable items stolen in Letterkenny burglary

first_imgHomepage BannerNews By News Highland – February 18, 2020 DL Debate – 24/05/21 WhatsApp Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Facebook News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th A number of valuable items have been stolen during a weekend burglary in Letterkenny. It happened at some stage between Saturday night last at 10pm and Sunday at 3pm.No damage was caused to the property to gain entry.It has been reported that a number of items were stolen from the house namely a 65 inch Samsung TV, a 40 inch Samsung TV, a pair of Alexander Mcqueen trainers and a pair of Nike Air Jordans.If anyone observed any people or vehicles in the Ashlawn area over the course of Saturday night and into Sunday afternoon that appeared untoward then please contact Gardaí in Letterkenny on 074-9167100 or the Garda Confidential line on 1800 666 111. Facebook Valuable items stolen in Letterkenny burglary Pinterest WhatsAppcenter_img Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Twitter Google+ Pinterest Google+ Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Previous article12 people awaiting in-patient beds at LUHNext articleGardai uncover substantial amount of cocaine in St Johnston News Highland Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programmelast_img read more

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